CACREP Self-Study Addendum

 


Self Study Corrections

Section D of the School Counseling was inadvertently cut off.  It is below.

D. CLINICAL INSTRUCTION

For the School Counseling Program, the 600 clock hour internship (Standard III.H) occurs in a school counseling setting, under the supervision of a site supervisor as defined by Section III, Standard C.1-2. The requirement includes a minimum of 240 direct service clock hours.

Documented in the course syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – School and the Student Handbook. (See II.A, Page 47)

The program must clearly define and measure the outcomes expected of interns, using appropriate professional resources that address Standards A, B, and C (School Counseling Programs). 

Documented in the course syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – School and the Student Handbook.  (See II.A, Page 47)

 

Southeast Missouri State University’s Response to Initial Reviewers. 

Section I

I. The institution provides technical and financial support to program faculty and students to ensure access to information systems and data analysis for teaching and research.

Reviewer’s Statement

Standard I

The response in the self-study document did not appear to address issues of technical and financial support for research.

 Response 

The support of research is important at Southeast Missouri State University and technical and financial support is provided.  This is done in a number of ways:

 1.  All faculty have computers.  These computers are updated on a rotating bases.  They all have internet access and current word processing, database, spreadsheet programs installed.  Faculty also have access to statistical programs such as SPSS and SAS. These can be installed on faculty computers as well. 

 2.  Faculty and students have electronic access to many research journals through various data bases.  Assistance can be provided by library staff on accessing this information.

 3.  Financial assistance is provided to faculty for research with several internal grant opportunities.  The Center for Assessment and Research in Education (CARE) provides small (Max $500) grants for faculty to assess in costs of doing small research projects.  This includes copying, postage, travel and so forth.  These grants are relatively easy to obtain and controlled within the College of Education by the Professional Development committee. Also the Funding for Results grants are provided by Grants and Research Funding Committee (GRFC) of the Faculty Senate. These grants are typically $2500 or less but may be more if needed.   

 4.  Also the Office of Sponsored Programs has as its primary propose to help faculty obtain funding for and conduct research.  It provides three types of services: “technical assistance, information management, and skill/knowledge development. Technical assistance is given in the proposal preparation phase, the proposal submission phase, and the project administration phase. Information management includes searching for or identifying potential fundors, monitoring external events, and communicating that
information to the University community. The development of skills and knowledge related to the process of grantsmanship takes place in one-on-one sessions with interested parties, formal events such as workshops, and linkage with individuals whose talents, pooled with the proposal author's, might enhance the proposal's chances of acceptance.” (See Appendix Addendum I.I)

 

                                                            Section II

2. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY - studies that provide an understanding of the cultural context of relationships, issues and trends in a multicultural and diverse society related to such factors as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics, education, family values, religious and spiritual values, socioeconomic status and unique characteristics of individuals, couples, families, ethnic groups, and communities including all of the following:

e. theories of multicultural counseling, theories of identity development, and multicultural competencies; and

Reviewer’s Statement

Standard K.2.e

Please provide further documentation to show that multicultural Counseling theories are covered.

 Response  

The theories of multicultural counseling, theories of identity development, and multicultural competencies were addressed and infused throughout the semester as evidenced by reading assignments such as articles in the Counseling Today, JDC, Handouts, and the chapters in textbook (Sue, D. W., & Sue, D. (2003) Counseling the culturally diverse. Theory and practice. (4th ed.) New York: John Wiley) and by class discussion. (See Appendix Addendum II.K.2.e)

 The syllabus will be revised to include the explicit statement as suggested and as to reflect the above practice.

 

8. RESEARCH AND PROGRAM EVALUATION - studies that provide an understanding of research methods, statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation, including all of the following:

d. principles, models, and applications of needs assessment, program evaluation, and use of findings to effect program modifications;

Reviewer’s Statement

Standard K.8.d

Please provide further documentation to show that this standard regarding needs assessment is addressed.  

Needs assessment itself is specifically addressed in the following syllabi: 

            CP 630 Foundations of School Counseling (Appendix II.H).

Section V. Course Content:

D. Organization, Administration, and Development of School Based Guidance Programs

1. Curriculum Development

a.         Needs Assessment and Follow-up

 CP 640 Counseling in Community Agencies (Appendix II.H).

Section V. Course Content:

E. Understanding and Counseling Communities and Services

1. Theories and Techniques of Community Needs Assessment

            a.         Design

            b.         Implement

            c.         Evaluate

 

Section III

 F. Orientation, assistance, consultation, and professional development opportunities are provided by counseling program faculty to site supervisors

 Reviewer’s Statement

Standard F

Please provide further documentation to show what professional development opportunities are offered to site supervisors.

 

Response 

Starting Fall 2005, the Counseling Program will be offering a course in Counselor Supervision. This course will provide training in supervision, and the opportunity for students enrolled in the class to provide individual and group supervision under the supervision of the instructor. The course primarily targets fully certified school counselors with at least two years of field experience. Therefore, our field supervisors are all potential students for the class. The course has been announced at a meeting of our regional division of the Missouri School Counselor Association, and a brief informational article about the course was published in the spring edition of News and Views, the newsletter for the Southeast Missouri School Counselor Association (SEMOSCA). We are currently investigating the possibility of offering this course at no charge to students.  

In addition, we have submitted a proposal to the Missouri School Counselor Association for their Fall 2005 Conference in November. A description of the proposed program is as follows:

School counselors may find themselves supervising counselors-in-training without having received formal training. This presentation will provide attendees with an overview of what supervision is, the nature of the supervisory relationship, and the legal and ethical issues associated with supervision. Models of supervision will be provided, and examples of good and poor supervision will be demonstrated. 

We have included information about this possible professional development opportunity in the newsletter article mentioned above as well (Supervision: More than Your Signature on a Piece of Paper!). This presentation will be the first step in our plan to provide training in supervision at this conference every year, and in future, we hope to expand this training to a workshop format. The majority of our field supervisors attend this conference, so this would be an excellent opportunity to provide professional development and training for them at an event they will already be attending. If this training proves to be successful, it may eventually take the place of the orientation meeting that has typically been held during the fall semester. Attendance and interest in this meeting has been declining in recent years, primarily due to supervisors having to take off work and travel to campus. If we provide the professional development opportunity at a conference that they normally attend, we are hoping to increase both attendance and interest. Another conflict that has arisen is that the meeting on campus has been held during the same month that field supervisors attend the conference. (See Appendix Addendum III.F)

 

Section IV

 

5. identify with the counseling profession through memberships and involvement in appropriate professional organizations (i.e., ACA and its divisions, branches, and affiliate organizations) and appropriate certifications (e.g., NCC) and/or licenses (e.g., LPC) pertinent to the profession; 

Reviewer’s Statement

Standard A.5

It was noted that Dr. Brewer appears to primarily identify with the field of psychology and school psychology.  She may want to consider joining ASCA or the Missouri School Counseling Association since she is teaching and supervising school counseling students.  

Response 

Soon after the CACREP self-study was printed and sent off, Dr. Brewer joined SEMOSCA during the fall meeting of the organization.  She believes that it is important to be involved with the organization that supports and mentors the students that she supervises.  Recently, Dr. Brewer has also joined MSCA and has submitted a proposal with her colleagues to present at their annual meeting in the fall. (See Appendix Addendum IV.A.5)

 

Standards for School Counseling

Reviewer’s Statement

School Counseling Standards A.7, 9, and 10

Please provide further documentation to show that these standards are addressed.

 Response       

7. the role of racial, ethnic, and cultural heritage, nationality, socioeconomic status, family structure, age, gender, sexual orientation, religious and spiritual beliefs, occupation, physical and mental status, and equity issues in school counseling;

This standard is addressed in the following syllabi:

CP 613 Social and Cultural Aspects of Counseling: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

A. through E.

            Section V. Course Content

                        A. through G. 

CP 614 Counseling Skills: (Appendix II.H).

            Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

C. The student will become knowledgeable of the factors, such as cultural diversity, that influence the helping process.

            Section V. Course Content

                        A., B., C., and F. 

CP 630 Foundations of School Counseling: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

D. The student will demonstrate skills in developing curriculum and delivering an effective comprehensive guidance program emphasizing cultural diversities and special needs in a school setting.

            Section IV. Expectations of Students

B. The student will be expected to develop and teach curriculum units for a school based guidance program that acknowledges the diversity concerns and special needs of the school population.

            Section V. Course Content

                        D. 1. e. Curriculum design for Cultural Diversity and Special Needs

 

            In addition, the following syllabi also address this standard:

            CP 610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

F. The student will develop and understanding of social and cultural issues associated with societal changes and societal subgroups.

            Section V. Course Content

                        F. 1. a through g           

            CP 611 Developmental Theories: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

D. The student will become aware of disabilities including the possible antecedents and consequences as they relate to human development.

F. The student will develop an understanding of professional issues dealing with development, learning, personality and environmental concerns.

            Section V. Course Content

                        D. Professional issues as they relate to the clients.

                        1 through 10 

            CP 612 Counseling Theories: (Appendix II.H).

            Section V. Course Content

                        B. 3. Issues surrounding clients with AIDS and

 4. Issues surrounding a multicultural perspective

                        C. 1. Clients from diverse populations 

            CP 615 Career Development: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

                        E.

            Section V. Course Content

                        A. 5. and 6.

                        E. 1. a. 1) and 2)

                        G. 3.

 CP 616 Group Counseling: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

A. To examine group dynamics, including group process components, the interactions of group members, the stages of group development, and the impact of cultural differences.           

            CP 617 Assessment in Counseling: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

F. The student will become familiar with factors that relate to assessment and evaluation of individuals, groups, and specific populations as they relate to age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, language, disability, culture, and spirituality. 

CP 631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools: (Appendix II.H).

            Section V. Course Content

E. Understanding the development of programs addressing issues and trends in school.

1. ADHD and ODD and 9. Diversity

                        F. Legal and Ethical Considerations

2. Multicultural Considerations 

CP 682 Internship Elementary: CP 683 Internship Secondary: CP 684 Internship School:  (Appendix II.H).

Section V. Course Content

D. The student will counsel clients from diverse populations (i.e. race, ethnicity, age, sex, etc.)

 9. knowledge and application of current and emerging technology in education and school counseling to assist students, families, and educators in using resources that promote informed academic, career, and personal/social choices; and 

This standard is primarily addressed in: 

CP 615 Career Development: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

F. The student will be expected to understand the use of computers in career assessment and in processing, storage, and retrieval of career information.

            Section IV. Expectations of Students

D. To administer, score, and interpret required career assessment instruments and computerized career self-assessment.

            Section V. Course Content

                        B. 1 through 3

                        C. 1. c. 

            In addition, the following syllabi also address this standard: 

            CP 610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics: (Appendix II.H).

Section IV. Expectations of the Student

C. The student will be expected to know about and use a variety of technological strategies to enhance learning.

            Section V. Course Content

                        E. 9. Technology used in the profession of counseling. 

            CP 617 Assessment in Counseling: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

            B.

10. ethical and legal considerations related specifically to the practice of school counseling (e.g., the ACA Code of Ethics and ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors).

This standard is primarily addressed in the following syllabi:

CP 610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

            G., H., and I.

Section IV. Expectations of the Student

            D.

Section V. Course Content

            G. 1 through 5

            H. 1 and 2

            J.   1 through 3 

CP 630 Foundations of School Counseling: (Appendix II.H).

Section V. Course Content

            C. Legal and Ethical Aspects Within the School

                        1 and 2 

CP 680 Counseling Practicum: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

C. The student will explore various aspects of professional conduct and ethical standards as they apply to practice.

            Section IV. Expectations of the Student

F. Students will be expected to sign a form stating that they have read and understand the ethical guidelines of the American Counseling Association and the Missouri Committee for Professional Counselors. 

CP 682, 683, 684 Internship Elementary, Secondary, and School: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

            B. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct. 

            In addition, the following syllabi also address this standard:

             CP 612 Counseling Theories: (Appendix II.H).

            Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

D. The student will understand legal and ethical issues confronting counselors.

Section V. Course Content

            B. Legal and Ethical Issues 

CP 613 Social and Cultural Aspects of Counseling: (Appendix II.H).

Section V. Course Content

            B. 1 and 2 

            CP 616 Group Counseling: (Appendix II.H).

            Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

                        C. To comprehend ethical issues involved in conducting a group.

Section V. Course Content

            E. 1 through 7 

CP 617 Assessment in Counseling: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

I. The student will understand and be able to apply the appropriate legal and ethical considerations in the use of standardized assessment instruments. 

CP 631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools: (Appendix II.H).

Section III. Purposes and Objectives of Course

D. The student will become acquainted with ethical standards which guide consultant behavior.

Section V. Course Content

            F. 1 and 2

            In addition: see Student Handbook:

            Statement of Professionalism

The Counseling Program and its faculty support the highest level of professionalism as set forth by "best practices" in the field, as well as ethical standards of such organizations as the American Counseling Association (ACA), the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC), and Southeast Missouri State University’s Committee for Research Involving Human Subjects. The Program expects each student to be knowledgeable of and to act in accordance with these standards. (See Appendix Addendum School)