CACREP Self-Study

 


Table of Contents

Section I – The Institution
Section II – Program Objectives and Curriculum
Section III – Clinical Instruction
Section IV – Faculty and Staff
Section V – Organization and Administration
Section VI – Evaluation in the Program
Standards for Community Counseling Programs
Standards for School Counseling Programs


Section I: The Institution

A. The institution in which the academic unit is housed is accredited by a regional or institutional accrediting body that is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

Southeast Missouri State University is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA) and the College of Education is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) (Appendix I.A).

B. The current institutional catalogue or bulletin accurately describes the academic unit and each program offered, including admissions criteria, minimum program requirements, matriculation requirements (for example, examinations, academic-standing policies), and financial aid information.

The Graduate Bulletin accurately describes the Community Counseling Program and the School Counseling Program, admission criteria, program requirements, matriculation requirements and financial aid information (Appendix I.B, Page 32).

C. The academic unit is clearly identified as part of the institution’s graduate offerings and has primary responsibility for the preparation of students in the program. If more than one academic unit has responsibility for the preparation of students in the program, the respective areas of responsibility and the relationships among and between them must be clearly defined.

The Graduate Bulletin accurately describes the Community Counseling Program and School Counseling Program as a part of the institution's graduate school.  The Department of Education Administration and Counseling is one of three departments within the College of Education.  The Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling has sole responsibility for the Community and School Counseling Programs.  No other academic unit has responsibility for the preparation of community or school counseling students (Appendix I.B, Page 32).

D. Cooperative relationships exist between the academic unit and other academic units that contribute to the professional preparation of students in the program as well as off-campus professional and community resources.

The Community Counseling Program requires prerequisite courses of 24 credit hours in counseling, psychology or sociology. PY636 Personality Assessment  (an option class meeting core appraisal from the required curriculum) is taught by the faculty in the Psychology Department which is located in the College of Liberal Arts. One of the program requirements, (not required by CACREP core, and also an option class) PY644 Advanced Psychopathology, is also taught in the Psychology Department (Appendix I.D, II.H).

The School Counseling Program requires a teaching certificate or three additional courses as prerequisite (Appendix I.D). They are: Teaching Certificate OR (No Teaching Certificate): EX 390 - Psychology & Education of the Exceptional Child OR EX 635 - Psychology and Education of Students with Special Needs AND  SE 273 - Fundamentals of Secondary School Education and SE 271 - Theories of Learning and Management - Middle & Secondary OR SE 635 - Theory of Learning and Instructional Strategies (SE 635 takes the place of both SE 271 and SE 273). These courses are taught by faculty within the College of Education.

The Counseling Programs have a cooperative relationship with many off-campus professional and community resources. The agencies and schools in Southeast Missouri support the programs. The practicum and internship courses places students in areas such as Sikeston, Dexter, Poplar Bluff, Farmington, Fredricktown, Perryville, and St. Genevieve. Availability of resources varies from one site to another. The students receive experiences in a multitude of community mental health centers (e.g. social services, hospitals, substance abuse treatment programs, and adolescent group homes) and schools (elementary, middle, secondary, and alternative). Click here for area resources.

E. The institution is committed to providing the program with sufficient financial support to ensure continuity, quality, and effectiveness in all of the program’s learning environments.

The Counseling Programs are an integral part of the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling. The distribution of funds between the differing programs of the department is appropriate and sufficient to meet the needs of all units. Listed below is the current budget for the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling for the fiscal year. In addition, there are further funds available from the College of Education for computer technology and equipment upgrades.

2003-2004 Budget     2004-2005 Budget  
Salary $874,990   Salary $941,221
Student labor  3,556   Student labor  3,628
Equipment 3,000   Equipment 5,253
Operations 19,895   Operations 20,603
Professional Development 4,550   Professional Development 4,550
         
Total  $905,941     $970,705

Last year the Professional Development total was $4,550 for the department. This year it is $4,550.  Current budget documents (Appendix I.E).

F. The institution provides encouragement and support for program faculty to participate in professional organizations and activities (for example, professional travel, research, and leadership positions).

The university encourages faculty members to participate in professional organizations and provides support for faculty development through a variety of avenues. The College of Education has a Professional Development Account available to faculty members who wish to broaden or improve their academic credentials, to keep abreast of current development in their academic field, to disseminate knowledge to their colleagues, and/or to strengthen their teaching abilities. In addition to the college allocation, each department has, as a part of the general operations budget, an amount specifically designated for faculty professional development. Also, a university-wide account through the provost's office is available to faculty members who require supplementary (to department and/or college) funding for professional activities designed to broaden or improve their academic credentials. Professional Development Money, CARE Grants (Appendix I.F).

Numerous opportunities for faculty professional development are offered by the university. The Center for Scholarship in Teaching and Learning sponsors a one-week workshop each August for new faculty members. In addition they offer numerous computer workshops. The School of Graduate and University Studies offers several experiences to faculty. For instance, opportunities exist for global/multicultural education through international exchange programs. The University Grants and Research Funding Committee and Funding for Results provides financial support to faculty whose projects are approved through this committee. The Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP) provides assistance to faculty and staff seeking external grant funds for research, artistic projects, public service or curriculum development (Appendix I.F).

Another avenue of support is the sabbatical leave which provides a means for improving teaching or instructional programs, engaging in research, writing for publication or pursuing creative activities (Appendix I.F).

Counseling faculty members are actively involved in local, state, national and international professional meetings, conferences and organizations. (See Faculty Section below).

G. The institution makes available to students in the program personal counseling services provided by professionals other than program faculty and students.

All students have full access to the university counseling services located on campus through the Center for Health and Counseling at Southeast Missouri State University.  They also have access to local community mental health centers in each community served by the university. Faculty do not provide counseling for students in the program.

Program faculty share information about counseling services for students through:

1. Orientation class which is taken at the beginning of each student's enrollment;
2. regular advising meetings;
3. informal faculty-student contacts ensuring that students have information available to them regarding counseling.

H. Access to library and other learning resources is appropriate for scholarly inquiry, study, and research by program faculty and students.

The Kent Library’s collections support the university’s educational and research activities. There are approximately 420,000 print volumes, 2,200 paper periodical subscriptions consisting of journals and curricular specific magazines, as well as over 5,000 additional full text online periodical titles. The library is also a partial depository for United States government documents totaling nearly 300,000 items. The microfilm collection of approximately 800,000 items provides, in compact form, a variety of materials from books to newspapers. Audio, visual & CD-ROM materials are also available (Appendix I.H).

Kent Library has an on-line computerized catalog system and also access to materials in other university libraries through inter-library loan. Additionally the library has a large array of online databases. Together, these systems form a comprehensive and integrated automated access system to material worldwide. The library has a Web-based catalog that is available 24/7 to both our on-campus and off-campus students. Kent Library is part of MOBIUS, a virtual collection of approximately 14 million items in the libraries of Missouri’s colleges and universities, with a single user interface that allows faculty and students to request library materials using any personal computer in any location with access to the library and MOBIUS on-line catalogs. Requested materials are delivered by the MOBIUS Delivery System within two or three days of being requested (Appendix I.H).

The library’s circulation and periodicals areas are open 95 hours a week during the regular school year and 57 hours per week in the summer. A reference desk staffed by seven full time professional reference librarians is also available. Additionally, the library’s on-line databases, book catalog, and interlibrary loan features are available to students in their dorm rooms, campus computer laboratories, off campus apartments, and distance education centers (Appendix I.H).

Although the department has added material to the library for its classroom resource support, the most positive feature of the library’s classroom support role is in the area of "access" for our students. Today’s typical student has access to full text databases, 48-hour book retrieval from any Missouri academic library, and interlibrary loan journal article often "faxed" with same day service. These library support features, coupled with a strong in-house collection, give our students the same opportunity as students at the largest universities in the United States.

I. The institution provides technical and financial support to program faculty and students to ensure access to information systems and data analysis for teaching and research.

Within Kent Library there are approximately 3,000 monograph titles which pertain to Educational Leadership and Counseling, within an Education Collection of 24,000 volumes. Additionally, there are 29 paper journal titles, costing $2,700 per year, in support of the department. The Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling’s book allocation totals $6,500 annually. Additionally, each academic department on campus has an active "approval plan," which assists faculty selection for new and forthcoming books (Appendix I.I).

At Southeast Missouri State University each academic department receives an annual allocation to purchase books and non-print material. Therefore the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling faculty do the actual selection of Educational Leadership and Counseling material for the library. Reference material may be purchased by the department or a separate budget line within Kent for reference books. The Kent Library Endowment Fund established in 1986, gives each academic department a third avenue to purchase monographs. It can be used by the academic departments to increase library holdings for new areas or in existing areas where collections are weak.

The library’s Collection Development Librarian, who heads the Collection Management Department of Kent Library, is responsible for working with the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling faculty in building the subject collection. The department itself has a library liaison that is in communication with the Collection Development Librarian. Additionally, the library’s Bibliographic Services Librarian, Head of Reference, and the entire library staff make themselves available upon request by any faculty member.

The library has computers available for student use in Kent Library plus an open computer lab which is also located in the library. Centrally located printers, as well as several photocopy machines, are readily available to library users.

Public computers - 130
Public copiers 6
Microfilm/fiche reader printer 2
Public printers 4

By using office or dorm computers, it is possible for a faculty member or student to note when a requested book is ordered, when it arrives for processing, and when the book receives a call number and is shelved in the collection. The department may, at any time, request a "computerized printout" of what they have ordered as a department in any given fiscal year.

The Information Access Department within Kent Library has as its top priority to assist university faculty in classroom research projects.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Off Campus Cohort Programs

Southeast Missouri State University has several education centers in our service region. These centers have classrooms, computer labs, ITV facilities, textbook services and so forth. The Counseling Program makes use of several of these facilities by offering off-campus cohort programs. When 20 to 25 students can be recruited from an area, a cohort program is started. Currently, there are two programs running concurrently - one in Kennett, Missouri with students graduating in August 2005 and another in Poplar Bluff, Missouri with students graduating in August 2006. In Spring Semester 2006, another cohort program may start in the Farmington area (pending enrollment).

The Cohort Counseling Programs are offered separately at off campus sites and they serve different students according to their regions. They are not different counseling programs as the forms and procedures, admissions requirements, course syllabi, graduation requirements remain the same. The same faculty are assigned to teach the courses according to an established rotation schedule. 


Section II: Program Objectives and Curriculum

A. A comprehensive mission statement has been developed that brings the program into focus and concisely describes the program’s intent and purpose. The mission statement

The Counseling Program at Southeast Missouri State University has the following Mission Statement published in the Student Handbook:

Society today faces complex challenges, which require positive general adjustment and adequate coping skills, if personal growth and vocational functioning are to be realized. For this reason, the Counseling Program has as its primary mission the preparation of a diverse group of learners from the Southeast Missouri region and the nation who can competently and ethically use psychological principles and counseling techniques to provide clients with the best opportunity to achieve a healthy adjustment in the areas of educational, personal, social, and career development.

Working within the human services and education fields demands well-rounded professionals. For this reason, program offerings and extra-curricular activities challenge students to develop professionally, personally, and socially. Graduates of the Counseling Program are prepared to deliver effective service in a variety of professional job placements (community counseling, school counseling, school psychological examiner) and are eligible to stand for licensure or certification in their respective area of specialty (Appendix II.A, Page 6).

1. describes the types of students it serves, its geographic orientation, and the priorities and expectations of the faculty;

The Counseling Program Mission Statement states the geographic orientation and the priorities and expectations of the faculty. … "the preparation of a diverse group of learners from the Southeast Missouri region and the nation who can competently and ethically use psychological principles and counseling techniques to provide clients with the best opportunity to achieve a healthy adjustment in the areas of educational, personal, social, and career development."

2. is the basis for the development of program objectives and curriculum;

The mission statement is the basis for program objectives and curriculum.

3. is published and available to faculty and students; and

The mission statement is published in the Student Handbook and is online for public review.

4. is reviewed at least once every three (3) years and revised as needed.

The Mission statement is reviewed at least every 3 years by the full faculty to determine any necessary changes or modifications.

B. The program objectives

1. reflect current knowledge and positions from lay and professional groups concerning the counseling and human development needs of a pluralistic society;

The Counseling Program Objectives are published in the Student Handbook and reflect the current professional thinking and state and national requirements certification, licensure and accreditation requirements (Appendix II.B).

They are:

As a result of successfully completing the graduate program in counseling, students can expect to have gained didactic knowledge and supervised experience in skills, functions, beliefs and characteristics of effective counseling. The following broad goals have been developed to assist students in gaining an overview of expected accomplishments:

1. Professional Orientation and Identity – Demonstrate an understanding of the counseling profession, develop an identity as a counselor and demonstrate a willingness to provide counseling services within the ethical guidelines of the counseling profession.

2. Counseling Theory – Gain significant knowledge of major counseling theories in the context of individual and group counseling, and to apply this knowledge to the actual counseling process.

3. Helping Relationships – Demonstrate effective individual and group counseling skills which facilitate client growth and to demonstrate the ability to evaluate progress toward treatment goals.

4. Social and Cultural Diversity – Develop an awareness of, and an appreciation for, social and cultural influences on human behavior and to recognize the impact of individual differences on the counseling process.

5. Human Growth and Development – Develop an understanding of developmental aspects of human growth and appreciation for the nature of human developmental behavior.

6. Career Development – Develop an understanding of career development and related life factors and the effects on an individual’s mental health and lifestyle.

7. Group Dynamics – Develop both theoretical and experiential understandings of group purpose, development, dynamics, counseling theories, group counseling methods and skills, and other group approaches.

8. Assessment – Gain knowledge and skills in assessment techniques and apply basic concepts to individual and group appraisal.

9. Research and Program Evaluation – Develop the ability to read, critique, evaluate, and contribute to professional research literature.

10. Specialization – Demonstrate sufficient knowledge and skills associated with the student’s chosen specialty (i.e., agency, school) in the areas of service, prevention, treatment, referral, and program management.

11. Experiential Learning – Develop, through supervised practicum and internship experiences, an integration of the knowledge and skills needed to be successful as counselors.

12. Personal Growth and Understanding – Develop, through self-reflection and insight, an understanding of oneself and the use of self in the counseling process. Develop a personal approach to counseling and client advocacy with a clear understanding of counselor functions. (Appendix II.A, Page 6)

2. reflect the present and projected needs of a pluralistic society for which specialized counseling and human development activities have been developed;

The understanding of diversity and its application in counseling situations is infused within the Counseling Program. Students in the Counseling Programs come from a diverse background inclusive of diversity as defined with the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics. The age range is broadly represented from the traditional to the non-traditional student. The faculty is sensitive to the needs of a pluralistic society. The faculty models sensitivity and provides opportunities for discussions, presentations, and multicultural lectures as well as teaching counseling skills needed to work with a diverse population.

3. reflect input from all persons involved in the conduct of the program, including program faculty, current and former students, and personnel in cooperating agencies;

Like the Counseling Program Mission Statement, the program objectives are reviewed on a regular basis with input from faculty, students, employers and supervisors.

1.  A formal faculty evaluation is conducted each semester. The department uses the national IDEA evaluation form. The standardized evaluation is anonymous and written comments are encouraged to provide feedback and suggestions on how the course or program may be enhanced. In addition to evaluations, faculty members are continuously receptive to student feedback. (Due to the confidential nature of this information it will be made available only in "hard copy" to the review team.  It will be made available to the onsite team.) (Appendix II.B).

2. The counseling program has developed a survey to be distributed to Community and School Counseling graduates, their employers and supervisors of practicum and internship students (Appendix II.B).

3. The advisory board meets at least annually to discuss and provide input about the program. Advisory Board Meeting (Appendix II.B).

4. Each semester current supervisors of the practicum and internship students meet with the program faculty to discuss standards and expectations of the supervision process.  Also once a year a supervisor meeting and training is held. Supervisors Meeting (Appendix II.B).

4. are directly related to program activities; and

The Counseling Program objectives are the foundation for the curriculum and program activities.

5. are written so that they can be assessed.

The Counseling Program has an Assessment Plan and develops an Assessment Report annually (Appendix II.B).

C. Programs in Career Counseling, College Counseling, Community Counseling, Gerontological Counseling, School Counseling, and Student Affairs are comprised of a minimum of two full academic years, defined as four semesters or six quarters of approved graduate-level study with a minimum of 48-semester credit hours or 72-quarter credit hours required of all students. Programs in Mental Health Counseling and Marital, Couple and Family Counseling/Therapy are comprised of approved graduate-level study with a minimum of 60-semester credit hours or 90-quarter credit hours required of all students.

The Community Counseling Program at Southeast Missouri State University requires 48 graduate semester hours which takes a minimum of two full academic years to complete (Appendix I.D).

The School Counseling Program at Southeast Missouri State University requires 48 graduate semester hours which takes a minimum of two full academic years to complete (Appendix I.D).

D. Students actively identify with the counseling profession by participating in professional associations such as the American Counseling Association (ACA), its divisions, branches, and affiliate organizations, and by participating in seminars, workshops, or other activities that contribute to personal and professional growth.

Students identify themselves as counselors. Most students join ACA. Most of the School Counseling students join Missouri School Counselors Association (MSCA) and Southeast Missouri School Counselors Association (SEMOSCA). The University sponsors the annual SEMOSCA conference on campus every year. Students are actively encouraged to participate in professional conferences and are required to attend at least one. Sigma Epsilon Sigma is an active chapter of Chi Sigma Iota. Faculty members sponsor students to present their research at the Annual Student Research Conference. Faculty present bi-annually to the St. Louis School Counselors association and students have co-presented with them.  St. Louis School Counselors Training (Appendix II.D).

A bulletin board is designated for workshop and seminar flyers. Trips are organized so faculty and students can attend area wide, state, regional and national professional events together. Students are required to attend at least one professional meeting while they are a student (Appendix II.D).

E. Over the course of one academic term, students meet for a minimum of 10 clock hours in a small-group activity approved by the program. This planned group requirement is intended to provide direct experiences as a participant in a small group.

Each student is required to take CP616 Group Counseling. During this class, 15 hours of small group experiences, including group participation and group leadership, are provided by the designated professor with assistance from the counselor education faculty. Students in the Ed.S. Advanced Internship often assist with this class (Appendix II.H).

F. Consistent with established institutional due process policy and ACA Ethical Standards, when evaluations indicate that a student is not appropriate for the program, faculty should assist in facilitating the student’s transition out of the program and, if possible, into a more appropriate area of study.

The Counseling Program faculty meet regularly to discuss students' progress. The program has a Policy on Student Retention outlined in the Student Handbook (Appendix II.A, Page 45). This policy outlines the need for appropriate remediation when possible, and the specific procedure when students are determined to be inappropriate for the counseling program.  When necessary, students are dismissed or assisted into a more appropriate area of study.

G. Flexibility is provided within the program’s curriculum to accommodate individual differences in student knowledge and competencies.

Graduate students enter the Southeast Missouri State University Graduate Program in Community or School Counseling for a variety of reasons. For the most part, their graduate degree will assist them in realizing their potential as well as provide the necessary education and experiential opportunities to be successful in a future setting of their choice. Because of the high value placed on the uniqueness of each individual in the program, faculty provide numerous opportunities for students to pursue and share their interests, skills, and talents with others. This is done through the following avenues:

1. Classroom discussion and written assignments - Students are encouraged to share their perspective on various issues pertinent to the field of counseling.

2. Course work - Students are invited to pursue their individual interests by selection of topical papers and projects. In addition, they are asked to share these interests with their peers thereby exposing students to diverse perspectives on any given topic.

3. The thesis, graduate paper project or portfolio required of each student invites in-depth pursuit of individual interests and unique dissemination of those interests.

4. Field experiences assist the student in fulfilling their professional goals.

H. Syllabi are distributed at the beginning of each curricular experience, are available for review by all enrolled or prospective students, and include all of the following:

1. objectives;

2. content areas;

3. required text(s) and/or reading(s);

4. methods of instruction, including a clear description of how content is delivered (e.g., lecture, seminar, supervised practical application, distance learning); and

5. student performance evaluation criteria and procedures.

All course syllabi contain information addressing: objectives of the course, content areas covered, required text(s) and/or reading(s), methods of instruction and student performance evaluation criteria and procedures. It is a university policy to provide students with a course syllabi at the beginning of each class. All currently approved syllabi are available to all students and the academic community on the program web site at: http://www4.semo.edu/counsel/Program/Syllabi/index.htm  
Students may review course syllabi at any time before or during acceptance into the program. (Course syllabi are in pdf format below and in Appendix II.H).

CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
CP611 Developmental Theories
CP612 Counseling Theories
CP613 Social and Cultural Aspects of Counseling
CP614 Counseling Skills
CP615 Career Development
CP616 Group Counseling
CP617 Assessment in Counseling
CP630 Foundations of School Counseling             
CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
CP640 Counseling in Community Agencies
CP643 Psychodiagnostics and Treatment
CP680 Counseling Practicum
CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
CP686-7 Internship – Community
GR691 Methods of Research
PY636 Personality Assessment
PY644 Advanced Psychopathology

I. Evidence exists of the use and application of research data among program faculty and students.

The faculty consistently obtains, disseminates and incorporates current research and professional thought. Faculty assume responsibility for annually updating the library collection. In addition, faculty personally subscribe to a number of journals and professional periodicals which are made available to students. Students are also encouraged and do share information and research with faculty and other students on a regular basis. Further, knowledge base references are attached to almost all syllabi. These lists are periodically updated.

J. Each program for which accreditation is sought must show a history of graduates.

School Counseling Graduates Community Counseling Graduates
 
Spring 2001
Reta Campbell
Mary Clark
Sherry Copeland
Rhonda Evans
Kevin Gillespie
Dana Heisserer
Rita Horton
Tina Howe
Nancy Langley
Tammie Lukefahr
Jeffery Ross
William Thom
Kimberly Thornbrough
Laura White

Summer 2001
Emily Carlisle
Angela Metje

Fall 2001
Heather Brooks

Spring 2002
Dawn Armstrong
Julie Bohannon
Catherine Boren
Kimberly Brooks
Decinda Douglas
Shannon Garner
Amy Jansen
Kathy Keller
Sally McDonald
Gladys Mosley
Lisa Queen
Tomoko Satake
Alice Sullivan
Sharon Witty
Dora Yates

Summer 2002
Laurie Coleman
Julie Penberthy
Marjorie Phillips

Spring 2003
Jessica Barnes
Heather Elfrink
Ceclie Goodman
Kenneth Halter
Felicia Kennedy
Cynthia Maclin
Caisa Pope
Stephanie Wilkerson
Rebeka Wright
Sara Wunderlich

Summer 2003
Debra Cobb
Sarah Hart
Johnna McCrary
Amy Pridemore
Beverly Robins
Jennifer Seabourne

Fall 2003
Christina Libla
Joanna Mathes

Spring 2004
Joy Gilman
Deanna Hager
Michele Hampton
Jennifer Heuring
Donna Horn
Shannon Jansen
Geren Dowdy
Starla Pulley
Christine Qualls
Julie Templeton

Summer 2004
Sarah Buerck
Terri Edney
Quinn Flexsenhar
Carla Gibbs
Helen Hensley
Amanda Horrell
Angel Klund
Amy Richardson
Pamela Sanders
Sarah Stephens

Spring 2001
Kristy Bundt

Summer 2001
Cathy Brock
Lorrie Chafin
Darlene Chesser
Jolean Logan
Lesley Wells

Spring 2002
Everett Way

Summer 2002
Kim Ballinger
Christina Heckencamp
Sam Hite
Kelly Hixson
Deidre Hornburg
Lynn Khanuja
Elvis Mooney, Jr

Fall 2002
Jessica Davis
Crystal Kiefer-Figge
Amy Hoffman
Patricia Hunter

Spring 2003
Kathryn Allgier
W. Kevin Stewart

Summer 2003
Jennifer Childers
Pamela Dudley
Shereen Khan
Terri Leible
Theresa Lumos
Kathleen Waggoner

Fall 2003
Nina Jackson
Angela McGowan
Gracan Montpetit

Spring 2004
Adrienne Spears

Summer 2004
Chea Hale
Chris Morrow
Tammy Hargis
Jaimee Henderson
Jennifer Melton
Jennifer Kirchhoff
Valerie Turner
Denise Wheeler

 

K. Curricular experiences and demonstrated knowledge in each of the eight common core areas are required of all students in the program. The eight common core areas follow.

1. PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY - studies that provide an understanding of all of the following aspects of professional functioning:

a. history and philosophy of the counseling profession, including significant factors and events;
b. professional roles, functions, and relationships with other human service providers;
c. technological competence and computer literacy;
d. professional organizations, primarily ACA, its divisions, branches, and affiliates, including membership benefits, activities, services to members, and current emphases;
e. professional credentialing, including certification, licensure, and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public policy on these issues;
f. public and private policy processes, including the role of the professional counselor in advocating on behalf of the profession;
g. advocacy processes needed to address institutional and social barriers that impede access, equity, and success for clients; and
h. ethical standards of ACA and related entities, and applications of ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling.

This material is primarily covered in CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics (Appendix II.H).

2. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY - studies that provide an understanding of the cultural context of relationships, issues and trends in a multicultural and diverse society related to such factors as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics, education, family values, religious and spiritual values, socioeconomic status and unique characteristics of individuals, couples, families, ethnic groups, and communities including all of the following:

a. multicultural and pluralistic trends, including characteristics and concerns between and within diverse groups nationally and internationally;
b. attitudes, beliefs, understandings, and acculturative experiences, including specific experiential learning activities;
c. individual, couple, family, group, and community strategies for working with diverse populations and ethnic groups;
d. counselors’ roles in social justice, advocacy and conflict resolution, cultural self-awareness, the nature of biases, prejudices, processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination, and other culturally supported behaviors that are detrimental to the growth of the human spirit, mind, or body;
e. theories of multicultural counseling, theories of identity development, and multicultural competencies; and
f. ethical and legal considerations.

This material is primarily covered in CP613 Social and Cultural Aspects of Counseling (Appendix II.H).

3. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT - studies that provide an understanding of the nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels, including all of the following:

a. theories of individual and family development and transitions across the life-span;
b. theories of learning and personality development;
c. human behavior including an understanding of developmental crises, disability, exceptional behavior, addictive behavior, psychopathology, and situational and environmental factors that affect both normal and abnormal behavior;
d. strategies for facilitating optimum development over the life-span; and
e. ethical and legal considerations.

This material is primarily covered in CP611 Developmental Theories (Appendix II.H).

4. CAREER DEVELOPMENT - studies that provide an understanding of career development and related life factors, including all of the following:

a. career development theories and decision-making models;
b. career, avocational, educational, occupational and labor market information resources, visual and print media, computer-based career information systems, and other electronic career information systems;
c. career development program planning, organization, implementation, administration, and evaluation;
d. interrelationships among and between work, family, and other life roles and factors including the role of diversity and gender in career development;
e. career and educational planning, placement, follow-up, and evaluation;
f. assessment instruments and techniques that are relevant to career planning and decision making;
g. technology-based career development applications and strategies, including computer-assisted career guidance and information systems and appropriate world-wide web sites;
h. career counseling processes, techniques, and resources, including those applicable to specific populations; and
i. ethical and legal considerations.

This material is primarily covered in CP615 Career Development (Appendix II.H).

5. HELPING RELATIONSHIPS - studies that provide an understanding of counseling and consultation processes, including all of the following:

a. counselor and consultant characteristics and behaviors that influence helping processes including age, gender, and ethnic differences, verbal and nonverbal behaviors and personal characteristics, orientations, and skills;
b. an understanding of essential interviewing and counseling skills so that the student is able to develop a therapeutic relationship, establish appropriate counseling goals, design intervention strategies, evaluate client outcome, and successfully terminate the counselor-client relationship. Studies will also facilitate student self-awareness so that the counselor-client relationship is therapeutic and the counselor maintains appropriate professional boundaries;
c. counseling theories that provide the student with a consistent model(s) to conceptualize client presentation and select appropriate counseling interventions. Student experiences should include an examination of the historical development of counseling theories, an exploration of affective, behavioral, and cognitive theories, and an opportunity to apply the theoretical material to case studies. Students will also be exposed to models of counseling that are consistent with current professional research and practice in the field so that they can begin to develop a personal model of counseling;
d. a systems perspective that provides an understanding of family and other systems theories and major models of family and related interventions. Students will be exposed to a rationale for selecting family and other systems theories as appropriate modalities for family assessment and counseling;
e. a general framework for understanding and practicing consultation. Student experiences should include an examination of the historical development of consultation, an exploration of the stages of consultation and the major models of consultation, and an opportunity to apply the theoretical material to case presentations. Students will begin to develop a personal model of consultation;
f. integration of technological strategies and applications within counseling and consultation processes; and
g. ethical and legal considerations.

This material is primarily covered in CP612 Counseling Theories and CP614 Counseling Skills (Appendix II.H).

6. GROUP WORK - studies that provide both theoretical and experiential understandings of group purpose, development, dynamics, counseling theories, group counseling methods and skills, and other group approaches, including all of the following:

a. principles of group dynamics, including group process components, developmental stage theories, group members’ roles and behaviors, and therapeutic factors of group work;
b. group leadership styles and approaches, including characteristics of various types of group leaders and leadership styles;
c. theories of group counseling, including commonalties, distinguishing characteristics, and pertinent research and literature;
d. group counseling methods, including group counselor orientations and behaviors, appropriate selection criteria and methods, and methods of evaluation of effectiveness;
e. approaches used for other types of group work, including task groups, psychoeducational groups, and therapy groups;
f. professional preparation standards for group leaders; and
g. ethical and legal considerations.

This material is primarily covered in CP616 Group Counseling (Appendix II.H).

7. ASSESSMENT - studies that provide an understanding of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation, including all of the following:

a. historical perspectives concerning the nature and meaning of assessment;
b. basic concepts of standardized and nonstandardized testing and other assessment techniques including norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessment, environmental assessment, performance assessment, individual and group test and inventory methods, behavioral observations, and computer-managed and computer-assisted methods;
c. statistical concepts, including scales of measurement, measures of central tendency, indices of variability, shapes and types of distributions, and correlations;
d. reliability (i.e., theory of measurement error, models of reliability, and the use of reliability information);
e. validity (i.e., evidence of validity, types of validity, and the relationship between reliability and validity;
f. age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, language, disability, culture, spirituality, and other factors related to the assessment and evaluation of individuals, groups, and specific populations;
g. strategies for selecting, administering, and interpreting assessment and evaluation instruments and techniques in counseling;
h. an understanding of general principles and methods of case conceptualization, assessment, and/or diagnoses of mental and emotional status; and
i. ethical and legal considerations.

This material is primarily covered in CP617 Assessment in Counseling (Appendix II.H).

8. RESEARCH AND PROGRAM EVALUATION - studies that provide an understanding of research methods, statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation, including all of the following:

a. the importance of research and opportunities and difficulties in conducting research in the counseling profession,
b. research methods such as qualitative, quantitative, single-case designs, action research, and outcome-based research;
c. use of technology and statistical methods in conducting research and program evaluation, assuming basic computer literacy;
d. principles, models, and applications of needs assessment, program evaluation, and use of findings to effect program modifications;
e. use of research to improve counseling effectiveness; and
f. ethical and legal considerations.

This material is primarily covered in GR691 Methods of Research (Appendix II.H).


Section III: Clinical Instruction

Clinical instruction includes supervised practica and internships that have been completed within a student’s program of study. Practicum and internship requirements are considered to be the most critical experience elements in the program. All faculty, including clinical instruction faculty and supervisors, are clearly committed to preparing professional counselors and promoting the development of the student’s professional counselor identity.

A. Each regular or adjunct program faculty member who provides individual or group practicum and/or internship supervision must have

1. a doctoral degree and/or appropriate clinical preparation, preferably from an accredited counselor education program;

Faculty that provide on-campus and off-campus individual or group supervision:

A. Zaidy MohdZain, Ph.D., Kent State University, Counselor Education and Supervision, Associate Professor. Website

Cheryl Milde, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Educational Psychology and Counselor Education, Associate Professor. Website

Julieta Monteiro-Leitner, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Educational Psychology and Counselor Education, Assistant Professor. Website

Verl T. Pope, Ed.D., Idaho State University, Counselor Education and Counseling, Associate Professor. Website

Janice E. Ward, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Educational Psychology and Counselor Education, Assistant Professor. Website

A. Lauren Brewer, Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia, School Psychology, Full-time Instructor. Website

Ada L. Cruce, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Educational Psychology and Counselor Education, Professor Emeritus

(Appendix III.A)

2. relevant professional experience and demonstrated competence in counseling; and

All regular and adjunct program faculty members providing individual and group supervision in community and school counseling have their doctoral degree in counseling and have extensive practical and supervision experience in community or school counseling.

Verl T. Pope, Ed.D., has worked in several community mental health agencies including an intermediate care facility, a state community mental health center, and several private practices.

A. Zaidy MohdZain, Ph.D., has been the community counseling program coordinator and actively researches legal and ethical trends and issues in counseling supervision.

Cheryl Milde, Ph.D., has experience in community mental health agencies and president of the Post-Secondary Counseling Program for the Southeast Missouri School Counseling Association.

Julieta Monteiro-Leitner, Ph.D., has experience in elementary and secondary school counseling supervision and serves as the Faculty Advisor for the Southeast Missouri School Counselors Association.

Janice E. Ward, Ph.D., has been the coordinator of the school counseling program and has supervised school counseling practicum and internship students at Arkansas State University and has worked as a school counselor.

A. Lauren Brewer, Ph.D., has been serving as a consulting psychologist and has served as a school psychologist for the Perry County School District.

Ada L. Cruce, Ph.D., has experience in elementary and secondary school counseling, and mental health counseling.

(Appendix III.A)

3. relevant training and supervision experience.

A. Zaidy MohdZain, Ph.D., has a doctorate in Counselor Education and Supervision from a CACREP-accredited program which includes emphasis in clinical and supervision training. He is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), an National Certified Counselor (NCC), and a certified school counselor K-12. He has several years of working as a professional counselor in various settings.

Cheryl Milde, Ph.D., has a doctorate in Educational Psychology and Counselor Education. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC), Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), and Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS). She has experience in community mental health as a counselor for the Missouri Board of Probation and Parole and several years of experience as a counselor educator and supervisor of master’s level students.

Julieta Monteiro-Leitner, Ph.D., has a doctorate in Educational Psychology and Counselor Education. She is a founder professor of the Master’s program in Psychology and Subjectivity at the University of Fortaleza, Brazil where she served as a practicum supervisor for master’s level students from 1994-1999.

Verl T. Pope, Ed.D., has a doctorate in Counselor Education and Counseling which includes an emphasis in clinical training and supervision. He is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), National Certified Counselor (NCC) and Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC).

Janice E. Ward, Ph.D., has a doctorate in Educational Psychology and Counselor Education. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), National Certified Counselor (NCC) and Certified School Counselor and School Psychological Examiner in Missouri.

A. Lauren Brewer, Ph.D., holds a doctorate in Educational and Counseling Psychology with an emphasis in School Psychology from the University of Missouri-Columbia. She is a Missouri Certified School Psychologist. She is a member of the following: Missouri Association for School Psychologists, Association for Specialists in Group Work.

Ada L. Cruce, Ph.D., has a doctorate in Counselor Education and is a licensed psychologist. She has life certification as an elementary and secondary counselor and has worked as both. Dr. Ada Cruce has been a counselor educator for almost 30 years, has had a private counseling practice, and worked in a community mental health center.

(Appendix III.A)

B. Students serving as individual or group practicum supervisors (DOES NOT APPLY)

C. A site supervisor must have

1. a minimum of a master’s degree in counseling or a related profession with equivalent qualifications, including appropriate certifications and/or licenses;

The site supervisors have a master’s degree in counseling or a related profession. The supervisors’ agreement documents the site supervisors’ credentials and qualifications. (Site Supervisor Qualifications Appendix III.C)

2. a minimum of two(2) years of pertinent professional experience in the program area in which the student is completing clinical instruction; and

All site supervisors have a minimum of two years of pertinent professional experience.

3. knowledge of the program’s expectations, requirements, and evaluation procedures for students.

All site supervisors receive the Guidelines for Practicum & Internship Experiences which delineates the purpose of the practicum and internship experiences and contains information concerning objective requirements, policies and expectations, evaluation criteria and the forms and documentation necessary to conduct a successful practicum and internship experiences (Appendix II.A, Page 47).

D. A clinical instruction environment, on or off-campus, is conducive to modeling, demonstration, and training and is available and used for clinical instruction by the program. Administrative control of the laboratory facility ensures adequate and appropriate access by the faculty and students. The clinical instruction environment includes, but is not limited to, the following:

1. settings for individual counseling with assured privacy and sufficient space for appropriate equipment (e.g., TV monitoring and taping);

The counseling program has five individual counseling rooms set up with video and audio equipment. Each room has a microphone and a camera connected to a TV set in the observation room. This setup allows the instructor to provide monitoring and immediate feedback as the counseling session evolves.

2. setting for small-group work with assured privacy and sufficient space for appropriate equipment;

There is a room for group work adjacent to the observation room. This setup also facilitates monitoring and immediate feedback of the group session whenever the instructor deems necessary.

3. necessary and appropriate technologies that assist learning, such as audio, video, and telecommunications equipment;

Videotape equipment is available for all students and faculty

4. settings with observational and/or other interactive supervisions capabilities; and

All counseling rooms have real-time electronic observational and interactive supervisions capabilities.

5. procedures that ensure that the client’s confidentiality and legal rights are protected.

All counseling rooms are located along a controlled private hallway. Sound damping panels are installed in the counseling rooms. (Pictures of Lab: Hallway, Small Lab Rooms, Group Room, Recording Room.)

E. Technical assistance for the use and maintenance of audio and videotape and computer equipment is available as well as other forms of communication technology.

The College of Education has a technical support person who assists and consults on computer and technical concerns. Further technical repair and installation personnel are available through Information Technology (Appendix III.D).

F. Orientation, assistance, consultation, and professional development opportunities are provided by counseling program faculty to site supervisors

Consultation, partnership and assistance to site supervisors are achieved through the use of the Student Handbook.  An orientation meeting for site supervisors takes place once a year. The on-site supervisor is contacted prior to the beginning of the practicum or internship experiences and is informed of the related requirements and expectations. Such information is provided in detail in the handout that is given to all of the supervisors and link to practicum and internship. The on-site supervisor is encouraged to guide the student to the setting, supply a copy of the relevant regulations, policies and procedures, introduce the student to all school faculty and staff; and supply appropriate office space. Once this infrastructure is provided, the team (University supervisor, on-site supervisor and the student) work together in a needs assessment to generate the plan of action for the practicum. The University supervisor makes two contacts with the on-site supervisor during practicum and during internship -- one is a site visit and subsequent contact is made via telephone or emails (Appendix II.A, Page 59).

G. Students must complete supervised practicum experiences that total a minimum of 100 clock hours. The practicum provides for the development of counseling skills under supervision. The student’s practicum includes all of the following:

1. 40 hours of direct service with clients, including experience in individual counseling and group work;

Each practicum student works and fulfills the requirement of 40 hours of direct counseling service, with special emphasis on the provision of responsive services, that is, individual and group counseling, and crisis intervention. Hours are logged in according to the forms duly provided to all students. (Documentation in Syllabus for CP680 Counseling Practicum and Sub-section of the Student Handbook) (Appendix II.H and II.A, Page 53).

2. weekly interaction with an average of one (1) hour per week of individual and/or triadic supervision which occurs regularly over a minimum of one academic term by a program faculty member or a supervisor working under the supervision of a program faculty member;

Practicum students meet with their University supervisor and their on-site supervisor a minimum of one hour per week for supervision. (Documentation in  Syllabus for CP680 Counseling Practicum and Sub-section of the Student Handbook.) (Appendix II.H and II.A, Page 53).

3. an average of one and one half (1.5) hours per week of group supervision that is provided on a regular schedule over the course of the student’s practicum by a program faculty member or a supervisor under the supervision of a program faculty member; and

All practicum students meet weekly for group supervision. This format facilitates group discussions of techniques or resolutions of difficulties, case reporting, and extensive exchange of feedback among the students and University supervisor. (Documentation in  Syllabus for CP680 Counseling Practicum and Sub-section of the Student Handbook.) (Appendix II.H and II.A, Page 53).

4. evaluation of the student’s performance throughout the practicum including a formal evaluation after the student completes the practicum.

Students receive evaluations throughout the practicum. Students are formally evaluated by mid-term and final evaluations by their site supervisor and University supervisor. Specific feedback is provided based on the evaluation forms (Appendix III.G).

H. The program requires students to complete a supervised internship of 600 clock hours that is begun after successful completion of the student’s practicum (as defined in Standard G.) The internship provides an opportunity for the student to perform, under supervision, a variety of counseling activities that a professional counselor is expected to perform. The student’s internship includes all of the following:

1. 240 hours of direct service with clients appropriate to the program of study;

Internship in counseling is one of the most comprehensive professional experiences for the master’s student. The intern fulfills the 240 hours of direct counseling service providing individual, group and crisis counseling. (Documentation in  Syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling and CP686-7 Internship – Community and  Sub-section of the Student Handbook.) (Appendix II.H and II.A, Page 56)

2. weekly interaction with an average of one hour per week of individual and/or triadic supervision, through the internship, (usually performed by the on-site supervisor);

All internship students meet for one hour per week with their on-site supervisor (Documentation in  Syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling and CP686-7 Internship – Community and  Sub-section of the Student Handbook.) (Appendix II.H and II.A, Page 56)

3. An average of one and one half hours per week of group supervision provided on a regular schedule throughout the internship, usually performed by the University supervisor;

All internship students meet weekly with the University supervisor for one hour and for an hour and a half for group supervision. (Documentation in  Syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling and CP686-7 Internship – Community and  Sub-section of the Student Handbook.) (Appendix II.H and II.A, Page 56)

4. the opportunity for the student to become familiar with a variety of professional activities in addition to direct service (e.g., record keeping, supervisions, information and referral, in-service and staff meetings);

During internship, students experience a wide variety of professional activities. These activities are listed in detail at (Documentation in  Syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling and CP686-7 Internship – Community and  Sub-section of the Student Handbook.) (Appendix II.H and II.A, Page 56)

5. the opportunity for the student to develop program-appropriate audio/ videotapes of the student’s interactions with clients for use in supervision;

Video or audio taping of on-site clients is expected, especially as they prepare for the oral defense of the comprehensive portfolio, which includes a videotape of a counseling session. If the policy of the site does not allow videotaping, volunteer clients are seen in the counseling lab on campus. (Documentation in  Syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling and CP686-7 Internship – Community and  Sub-section of the Student Handbook.) (Appendix II.H and II.A, Page 56)

6. the opportunity for the student to gain supervised experience in the use of a variety of professional resources such as assessment instruments, technologies, print and non-print media, professional literature, and research; and

Throughout the program students are trained to use professional resources such as assessment instruments, computers, print and non-print media, professional literature, research, and information and referral to appropriate providers. When they are in their internship, the students are expected to seek and apply appropriate resources. The internship site supervisors are encouraged to provide interns with a broad experience.  (Documentation in  Syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling and CP686-7 Internship – Community and  Sub-section of the Student Handbook.) (Appendix II.H and II.A, Page 56)

7. a formal evaluation of the students performance during the internship by the University supervisor in consultation with the site supervisor

The University supervisor in consultation with the site supervisor conducts a formal mid-term and final evaluation of the student’s performance (Appendix III.H).

I. The practicum and internship experiences are tutorial forms of instruction; therefore, when program faculty provides the individual supervision, the ratio of five students to one faculty member is considered equivalent to the teaching of one three-semester hour course. Such a ration is considered maximum per course.

The counseling program faculty members are cognizant of the appropriate size of practica. As a norm, community practica are taught at a ratio of 5 students to 1 faculty, which is considered a three semester hour course. However recently, faculty members have been using a dyadic supervision in community practicum -- in these cases, 4 or 6 students being registered for practicum.  In the school counseling practicum courses we have been systematically lowering the number of students over the last three years.  In fall 2002, there were 19 students in two sections.  In fall 2003 there were 25 students in three sections and in fall of 2004 there were 20 in four sections of school practicum. Practicum and Internship Enrollment Data (Section III.I)

J. Group supervision for practicum and internship should not exceed ten students.

The counseling program faculty members are cognizant of the appropriate size of group supervision seminars for practicum and internship. As a norm, community counseling group seminars maintain a ratio of 10:1. Only once in the last three years has the community internship exceeded the 10:1 ratio.  However, in the past the school counseling has exceeded  this ratio.  It has been a significant process to lower the Enrollment in internship. For example,  in the spring of 2004 there were three sections of school internship (an addition of one) with 13, 13 and 14 students in them.  It is expected that by spring 2005 the 10:1 ratio will be met regularly.  However, due to the flexibly of an evening program, there still may be times that it might be necessary to add one or two extra students in the group supervision.  Practicum and Internship Enrollment Data (Section III.J).

K. Clinical experiences (practicum and internship) should provide opportunities for students to counsel clients who represent the ethnic and demographic diversity of their community.

Practicum and internship experiences provide opportunities for students to counsel clients representative of ethnicity, lifestyle, and demographic diversity of the community in which the program is placed. (Documentation in Syllabus for CP680 Counseling Practicum and  CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling and CP686-7 Internship – Community) (Appendix II.H).

L. Students formally evaluate their supervisors and learning experiences at the end of their practicum and internship experiences

Students evaluate their sites and supervisors at the conclusion of their practicum and internship experiences (Appendix III.L).

M. Program requires students to be covered by professional liability insurance while enrolled or participating in practicum, internship, or other field experiences.

Students are required to have professional liability insurance. Students are informed of the future need for professional liability insurance while enrolled in their introductory classes such as CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics. The Student Handbook also clearly asserts the importance of student liability insurance. (Documentation in  Syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling and CP686-7 Internship – Community and  Sub-section of the Student Handbook) (Appendix II.H and II.A, Page 50).


Section IV: Faculty and Staff

A. The counselor education academic unit must demonstrate that it has faculty resources of appropriate quality and sufficiency to achieve its mission and objectives. The academic unit has an identifiable full-time core faculty responsible for its leadership who:

1. are sufficient in number for their academic and professional responsibilities;

2. number at least three (3) individuals whose academic appointments are to the unit in counselor education; (If one or more of the three (3) academic appointments is not teaching full-time in the academic unit then there must be at least three (3) full time equivalent (FTE) faculty teaching in the academic unit);

Six full time faculty are specifically assigned to the counseling programs (Appendix III.A).

Program faculty:
Dr. A. Lauren Brewer (100% Counselor Education)
Dr. Cheryl Milde (100% Counselor Education)
Dr. A. Zaidy MohdZain (100% Counselor Education)
Dr. Julieta Monteiro-Leitner (100% Counselor Education)
Dr. Verl T. Pope, (100% Counselor Education)
Dr. Janice E. Ward (100%) Counselor Education)

3. have earned doctoral degrees in counselor education, preferably from CACREP accredited programs, or doctoral degrees in a closely related field;

4. have relevant preparation and experience in the assigned area of teaching;

5. identify with the counseling profession through memberships and involvement in appropriate professional organizations (i.e., ACA and its divisions, branches, and affiliate organizations) and appropriate certifications (e.g., NCC) and/or licenses (e.g., LPC) pertinent to the profession; and

Dr. A. Lauren Brewer is a full-time term instructor and holds a doctorate in Educational and Counseling Psychology with an emphasis in School Psychology from the University of Missouri-Columbia--an APA accredited program. She is a Missouri Certified School Psychologist. She has one year teaching experience in a Counselor Education program and over 3 years experience as a School Psychologist. She is a member of the following: Missouri Association for School Psychologists, Association for Specialists in Group Work.

Dr. Cheryl Milde is a tenured associate professor and holds a doctorate in Counselor Education and Counseling from Southern Illinois University--Carbondale’s CACREP accredited program. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS), and National Certified Counselor (NCC). She has over 12 years teaching experience in a Counselor Education program and over 20 years experience as a Counselor. She is a member of the following: American Counseling Association, American Psychological Association, Association for Counselor Education and Supervision, American Counseling Association of Missouri, Missouri School Counselor Association, Southeast Missouri School Counselor Association, Chi Sigma Iota, and Phi Kappa Phi (Life Member).

Dr. A. Zaidy MohdZain is a tenured associate professor and holds a doctorate in Counselor Education and Supervision from Kent State University’s CACREP accredited program. He is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), National Certified Counselor (NCC), and a certified school counselor K-12. He has over 12 years teaching experiences in CACREP-accredited programs and over 5 years of clinical experience working in various settings. He is a member of American Counseling Association (ACA), Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors (IAMFC), Chi Sigma Iota (Life member), North Central ACES, Southeast Missouri School Counselors Association.

Dr. Julieta Monteiro-Leitner is a fourth-year tenure track assistant professor and holds a doctorate in Counselor Education from the Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education at Southern Illinois University- Carbondale. She is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) and a Certified Psychodrama Psychotherapist by the Brazilian Federation of Psychodrama (FEBRAP), an International Branch of the American Society of Psychodrama, Group Psychotherapy and Sociometry. She was a private practitioner as well as a University Professor for eight years in Fortaleza, Brazil. She is a member of the following professional associations: American Counseling Association, American Association for Specialist in Group Work, Association for Counselor Educator and Supervision, American School Counseling Association, Missouri School Counselor Association, Southeast Missouri School Counselor Association, Chi Sigma Iota, Phi Delta Kappa.

Dr. Verl T. Pope is a tenured associate professor and holds a doctorate in Counselor Education and Counseling from Idaho State University’s CACREP accredited program. He has specific training in Mental Health Counseling, Marriage and Family Counseling, Assessment, Group Work and Counselor Supervision. He is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS), Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC) and National Certified Counselor (NCC). He has over seven years teaching experience in a Counselor Education program and over 11 years experience as a Counselor. He is a member of American Counseling Association, American Mental Health Counselors Association, Association for Counselor Education and Supervision, Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers (Clinical Member), American Counseling Association of Missouri, Missouri Mental Health Counselors Association, Southeast Missouri School Counselors Association, Chi Sigma Iota (Life Member).

Dr. Janice E. Ward is an assistant professor and holds a doctorate in Psychological Education and Counselor Education from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale’s CACREP accredited program. She has specific training in Community Counseling, School Counseling, Assessment, and Counselor Supervision. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), a National Certified Counselor (NCC), and a certified School Counselor and School Psychological Examiner. She has two years of teaching experience in a Counselor Education program and two years experience as a school counselor. She is a member of the American Counseling Association, the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision, the Southeast Missouri School Counselor’s Association, the Missouri School Counselors Association, and Chi Sigma Iota.

(Appendix III.A)

6. have the authority to determine program curricula within the structure of the institution’s policy.

The Counseling Faculty makes up the Counseling Program Curriculum Committee. All changes in program structure or curriculum must originate in this committee, be approved by the department, college and graduate school. While the department, college and graduate school have some say in verifying that university standards are followed, the responsibility for program curricula rests with the Counseling Faculty. (Department Committees) (Appendix III.A).

B. The academic unit has clearly defined administrative and curricular leadership that is sufficient for its effective operation. A faculty member may hold more than one of the following positions simultaneously.

The Counseling faculty currently rotate various coordinator positions. This allows for variations in perspective and a distribution of the work load.

1. A core faculty member is clearly designated as the academic unit leader for counselor education who

a. is responsible for the coordination of the academic unit,

Dr. Verl T. Pope is currently serving as the Coordinator of the Counseling Programs. His term was due to expire July 2004 but will serve one additional year to help complete the CACREP process (Appendix III.A).

b. receives inquiries regarding the overall academic unit,

While all faculty respond to student inquiries, Dr. Pope handles most prospective student and administrative inquiries. He facilitates the writing of various required reports and information dissemination.

c. is assigned at least 50% to the academic unit,

Dr. Pope’s teaching assignment is exclusively Counselor Education.

d. makes recommendations regarding the development of and expenditures from the budget,

Dr. Pope attends Department Chair meetings with the Dean and has input regarding budget, teaching assignments, course development and faculty load.

e. has release time from faculty member responsibilities to administer the academic unit, and

Dr. Pope is granted three hours release time from the regular nine hour teaching load.

f. provides or delegates year-round leadership to the operation of the program.

Dr. Pope is on a 10 month contract and he teaches summer courses and responds to inquiries and provides administrative leadership during the summer. There is no compensation for administrative work in the summer.

2. One core faculty member is identified as the coordinator for each program for which accreditation is being sought and has

a. a teaching assignment in the program,

b. identified responsibilities as coordinator, and

c. relevant preparation and experience.

Dr. A. Zaidy MohdZain currently serves as the Community Counseling Coordinator. His teaching assignments are exclusively in Counseling. He is responsible for the Community Counseling curriculum and proposing possible improvements. He responds to inquiries regarding the Community program, works with site supervisors, advises many community students, and supervises community internship. Further he keeps himself apprised of current issues that affect Community Counselors (e.g. licensure, malpractice) and disseminates this information to faculty and students. His training and experience is in community mental health (Appendix III.A).

Dr. Janice E. Ward currently serves as the School Counseling Coordinator. Her teaching assignments are exclusively in Counseling. She is responsible for the School Counseling curriculum and proposing possible improvements. She responds to inquires regarding the School program, works with schools, advises many school students, and supervises a school internship. Further she keeps herself apprised of current issues that affect School Counselors (e.g. certification, school issues) and disseminates this information to faculty and students. Her training and experience is in school guidance (Appendix III.A).

3. A core faculty member is identified as the clinical coordinator for the academic unit and/or program who

a. is responsible for the coordination of all clinical experiences in each counselor education program for which accreditation is sought,

b. is the individual to whom inquiries regarding clinical experiences are referred, and

c. has clearly defined responsibilities as clinical coordinator.

Dr. Cheryl Milde currently serves as the Clinical Coordinator. Her teaching assignments are exclusively in Counseling. She responds to all clinical inquiries. She is responsible for coordinating all clinical practicum and internship placements. She evaluates internship sites, develops new sites, maintains a list of site supervisors with appropriate credentials, and recommends possible improvements in clinical experiences (Appendix III.A).

4. If the counselor education academic unit operates a clinical facility, there must be a facility director who

a. is responsible for the overall operation of the facility,

b. has identified responsibilities, and

c. works closely with the clinical coordinator.

The Counseling Program does not operate a clinical facility at this time.

C. The counselor education academic unit may employ adjunct and/or affiliate counselor education faculty who

1. hold graduate degrees, preferably from CACREP accredited programs;

2. have relevant preparation and experience in the assigned area of teaching;

3. identify with the counseling profession through memberships in appropriate professional organizations (i.e., ACA and its divisions, branches, and affiliate organizations) and appropriate certifications (e.g., NCC) and/or licenses (e.g., LPC) pertinent to the profession; and

4. understand the mission, goals, and curriculum of the program.

The Counseling Program is selective in the Adjunct Faculty that are retained to teach. The following have been used in the last several years to teach counseling courses:

Dr. Ada L. Cruce is an emeritus counseling faculty. She has 28 years experience teaching as a counselor educator at Southeast Missouri State University. She has also had experience as a psychologist in a mental health agency, and as an elementary and secondary school counselor. Dr. Cruce has also been in private practice. Her doctorate is in Counselor Education, from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, 1975 (Appendix III.A).

D. During the three-year period preceding the date of application for program accreditation, core faculty should have engaged in activities of ACA and/or other professional activities including all of the following:

1. development/renewal (e.g., attended appropriate professional meetings, conventions, workshops, seminars);

2. research and scholarly activity; and

3. service (e.g., program presentations, workshops, consultations, speeches, direct service).

The Counseling Program Faculty is very active in the professional activities. Much of this can be reviewed in individual vitas (Appendix III.A), however select information is presented below:

Dr. A. Lauren Brewer

Publications

Pope, V. T., Pope C.E. and Brewer A.L. Training of Psychological Examiners versus School Psychologists, (Manuscript in Preparation.)

Dissertation

Perfectionism and Parenting: The Relationships of Perceived Parenting Style of Parent, Attachment, Parent Status and Gender to Parental Perfectionism. August, 2001.

Presentations

Building Bridges to the Community - A Southeast Missouri State University Experience. Program presented at the annual meeting of North Central ACES, St. Louis, Mo. Co-presenter (October, 2004).

TBI Support Partner Program, Training Workshop, Cape Girardeau, MO Coordinator & Presenter (March, 2000).

New Training Areas in Doctoral School Psychology: Students’ Perspectives. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of APA, Chicago, Ill. Co-presenter (August, 1997).

Advanced Study

Teaching Enhancement Workshop, Presented by the Center for Scholarship in Teaching and Learning, SEMO State University. (August, 2003).

Counselor Educator Meeting, Sponsored by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE). (October, 2003 and April, 2004).

Dr. Cheryl Milde

Publications

Milde, C.M. & Pope, V.T. (2002). Intelligence testing in schools: Potential pitfalls for counselors. The Counseling Interviewer, 34(2), 32-33.

Milde, C.M. (2001). Addressing the needs of the difficult to heal client: Facilitating collaboration between counseling and an alternative medical model. Dimensions of Counseling: Research, Theory, and Practice, 30(2), 8-13.

Presentations

Actual and Perceived Roles of School Counselors. Presentation to St. Louis Pubic Schools Counselors In-Service Conference, St. Louis, MO. Invited co-presenter (March 2003).

Philosophy and Practice: How Are We Explaining Current Counseling Practice to Interns? North Central Association for Counselor Educators and Supervisors, Cincinnati, OH. Peer reviewed (October, 2003).

How to Become a Counselor. Presentation to Psychology Club/Psi Chi Meeting; Common Hour; Southeast Missouri State University. Invited co-presenter (October, 2003).

Bunch,L., Hiatt,S., Milde,C. & Robbins,J. (November, 2003). What Are Counselors Certified to Do? Presented at the Missouri School Counselor Association annual meeting, Osage Beach, MO. (State invited).

Marr, D.D. & Milde, C.M. (March, 2002). Up From the Ashes: A Counselor’s Journey Through Loss and Recovery. Presented at the American Counseling Association Conference, New Orleans, LA. (National peer reviewed).

Monteiro-Leitner, J., Asner, K., Milde, C., Skelton, D., & Leitner, D. (October, 2002). The Controversy Between Ideal and Actual Roles of School Counselors. Presented at the Association for Counselor Educators and Supervisors, Park City, UT. (National Peer Reviewed).

Marr, D.D. & Milde, C.M. (October 2002). Addiction Issues and Counselor Self-efficacy: Developing a Pedagogical Model. Presented at the Association for Counselor Educators and Supervisors, Park City, UT. (National peer reviewed).

Bunch, L., Hiatt, S., & Milde, C. (November, 2002). What Are Counselors Certified to Do? To be presented at the Missouri School Counselor Association annual meeting, Osage Beach, MO. (State invited).

Milde, C.M. (March 2001). Working Outside "The Box": Adolescent Depression. Presented at the St. Louis County Public School Counseling Association Workshop, St. Louis, MO. (Invited).

Milde, C.M., Heckenkamp, C.M., & Hunter, P. (April 2001). Decision-Making Styles: How They Affect Career Choice. Presented at the Dexter High School Career Fair, Dexter, MO. (Invited).

Milde, C.M., Pope, V.T., Skelton, D.A., MohdZain, A.Z., & Leitner, J.M. (October, 2001). IQ Testing: Should School Counselors Quit? Presented at the North Central Association for Counselor Educators and Supervisors (NCACES) Regional Conference, Chicago, IL. [Chaired proposal and program outline; unable to attend for personal reasons; others very successfully carried off the presentation.] (Peer reviewed).

Advanced Study

Counselor Educator Meeting, Sponsored by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), Lake Ozark, MO. (April, 2003).

Counselor Educator Meeting, Sponsored by the Association for Counselor Educators and Supervisors, Cincinnati, OH. (October, 2003).

Counselor Educator Meeting, Sponsored by the MO School Counselors Association (MSCA), Lake Ozark, MO. (November, 2003).

Conference, Sponsored by the American Counseling Association (ACA), New Orleans, LA. (April, 2002).

Counselor Educator Meeting, Sponsored by the Association for Counselor Educators and Supervisors, Park City, UT. (October, 2002).

Counselor Educator Meeting, Sponsored by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), Lake Ozark, MO. (March, 2002).

Technology Enhancement Workshop, Presented by the Center for Scholarship in Teaching and Learning, SEMO State University. (January, 2001).

Dr. A. Zaidy MohdZain

Presentations

MohdZain, Z. (March 2003). Tort Liability and Ethics. Presentation to St. Louis Pubic Schools Counselors In-Service Conference, St. Louis, MO. (Invited).

MohdZain,Z., Milde, C., Pope,V., & Skelton,D. (October, 2003). How to Become a Counselor. Presentation to Psychology Club/Psi Chi Meeting; Common Hour; Southeast MO State University. (Invited).

ISAC: Promoting Counseling Accountability Through Valid Outcome Research. Presentation at the American Counseling Association (ACA) World Conference, New Orleans, LA.

International Students in Counselor Preparation Programs: Helpful Hints and Issues for Counselor Educators. Presentation at the North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (NCACES) Conference, Oak Brooks, IL.

Intelligence Testing: Should School Counselors Quit? North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (NCACES) Conference, Oak Brooks, IL.

Professional Service

Current as a member of the Editorial Board of the Family Journal: Counseling and Therapy for Couples and Families. This journal is published by the International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors (IAMFC), a division of the American Counseling Association (ACA). Reviewed an average of 7 manuscripts per academic year.

Member of the Editorial Review Board of the Missouri Professors of Educational Leadership (MPEA). Reviewed manuscripts and vignettes submitted for publications.

Advanced Study

Conference, Sponsored by the American Counseling Association (ACA), Anaheim, CA. (2003). [Earned 25.25 continuing education contact clock hours (2.53 CEU’s)].

Technology Drop-Box Workshop (CSTL), Presented by the Center for Scholarship Teaching and Learning, SEMO State University.

Technology PDF File Workshop (CSTL), Presented by the Center for Scholarship Teaching and Learning, SEMO State University.

Conferencce, Sponsored by the American Counseling Association (ACA), New Orleans, LA. (2002).

Conference, Sponsored by the North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (NCACES), Oak Brooks, IL. (2001).

Dr. Julieta Monteiro-Leitner

Publications

Maclin, C. & Monteiro-Leitner, J. (August, 2004). Planning for the elementary to middle school transition: An experience on progress in a rural midwest middle school. National Forum of Applied Educational Research Journal, 18(3), 1-8.

Monteiro-Leitner, J., Asner-Self, K., Milde, C., Leitner, D., & Skelton, D. (August, 2004). Controversy between the ideal and actual school counselors’ duties and responsibilities. Professional School Counselor Journal, submitted and under review.

Monteiro-Leitner, J. & Dollinger, S. (Manuscript in preparation). Ethnographic study of poverty, collective orientation , and identity among kids on the streets in Brazil: A ten year follow up.

Presentations

Stephens, S. J. & Monteiro-Leitner, J. (April 14, 2004). The Bully and You: A Consultation Program on Bullying for Use in Schools. Poster presentation at the Twelfth Annual Student Research Conference, SEMO State University. (Reviewed by inter-department faculty).

Molina, B., Monteiro-Leitner, J., Brown, S. & Estrada, D. (March 31, 2004). Four Ways of Multicultural Counseling – The Art and Wisdom of Integrating Practice and Science While Keeping the Role of Advocacy in Mind. National Conference of the American Counseling Association (ACA), Kansas City, MO. Peer reviewed. (April 1-4, 2004).

Maclin, C., Hart, S., & Monteiro-Leitner, J. (November, 2003). Strategies to Facilitate the Transition from Elementary to Middle School. Missouri School Counseling Association Fall Conference. Invited. (This paper was Sarah Hart’s non-thesis paper to which I served as a second reader.)

Monteiro-Leitner, J. (August, 2003). Keynote speaker for the Inaugural class for the academic year as one of the founder professors of the Master’s program in Psychology and Subjectivity. Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, Brazil. (Invited).

Nine, B. & Monteiro-Leitner, J. (April 16, 2003). A Career Counseling Program for College Aged Students. Poster presentation at the Eleventh Annual Student Research Conference, SEMO State University. (Reviewed by inter-department faculty).

Gladding, S., Molina, B., Monteiro-Leitner, J., Brown, S., & Whittington-Clark, L. (March 25, 2003). Creative Arts Across Cultures – Let’s Celebrate 50 Years of Excellence. National Conference of the American Counseling Association (ACA), Anaheim, CA. (National peer reviewed).

Monteiro-Leitner, J., Leitner, D., Milde, C., & Skelton, D. (March 7, 2003). The Actual and Perceived Roles of School Counselors. St. Louis Public School Counselors In-Service Conference (Preliminary discussion of the results of the survey), St. Louis, MO. (Invited).

Monteiro-Leitner, J. (February 26, 2003). Teacher Education Issues Around the World. College of Education Diversity and International Teaching Committee (Panel of discussion, focusing on education in Brazil). (Invited).

Monteiro-Leitner, J., Asner, K., Milde, C., Skelton, D., & Leitner, D. (October, 2002). The Controversy Between Ideal and Actual Roles of School Counselors. Association for Counselor Educators and Supervisors (ACES) National Conference, Park City, UT. (National peer reviewed).

Buerck, S. & Monteiro-Leitner, J. (April 17, 2002). A Career Counseling Project for Middle School Students, Grades Six-Eight. Poster presentation at the Tenth Annual Student Research Conference, SEMO State University. (Reviewed by inter-department faculty).

Gladding, S., Mollina, B., & Monteiro-Leitner, J. (March 25, 2002). Four Ways of Group Counseling: An Integrated Approach for Celebrating Unity in Diversity. National Conference of the American Counseling Association (ACA), New Orleans, LA. (National peer reviewed).

Monteiro-Leitner, J. (Chair), Molina, B., Brown, S., Whittington-Clark, L., & Chung, R. (March 24, 2002). An Integrative Approach of Group Work Recognizing and Honoring the Richness in Diversity. National Conference of the American Counseling Association (ACA), New Orleans, LA. (National peer reviewed).

Milde, C.M., Pope, V.T., Skelton, D.A., MohdZain, A.Z., & Monteiro-Leitner, J. (October, 2001). IQ Testing: Should School Counselors Quit? North Central Association for Counselor Educators and Supervisors (NCACES) Regional Conference, Chicago, IL. (Peer reviewed).

Gladding, S., Molina, B., Monteiro-Leitner, J., & Garrett, M. (2001, March). Four Ways of Group Counseling: Celebrating Dignity and Diversity. American Counseling Association (ACA) Annual Conference (Workshop demonstrating the affinities of Gestalt, Creative Arts, Psychodrama and Cherokee Healing and application in group work.), San Antonio, TX. (National peer reviewed).

Advanced Study

Teaching Enhancement Workshop, Presented by Center for Scholarship in Teaching and Learning. (August, 2004)

Counselor Educator Meetings, sponsored by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE). (Biannual attendance since April, 2002).

Dr. Verl T. Pope

Publications

Milde, C. M. & Pope, V. T. (2002). Intelligence testing in schools: Potential pitfalls for counselors. The Counseling Interviewer, 34(2), 32-33.

Pope, V. T. and Thomsen, S. E. (2002). Sexual harassment, the supreme court and the school counselor. World Council for Curriculum and Instruction, Tenth Triennial World Conference, Conference Proceedings.

Pope, V. T. (2001). The Prevalence of childhood and adolescent sexual abuse of sex offenders. Psychological Reports, 89, 355-362.

Presentations

Techniques in Working with Couples. Workshop, Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO. (March, 2004). Presenter.

Power of Positive Thinking. Department of Probation and Parole Workshop, Cape Girardeau, MO. (December, 2003). Invited presenter.

The Contemporary School Counselor. Workshop, St. Louis Public Schools Counselors In-Service Conference, St. Louis, MO. (March, 2003). Co-presenter.

Sexual Harassment, the United States Supreme Court and the Professional Educator. World Council for Curriculum and Instruction., Tenth Triennial World Conference, Madrid, Spain. (September 2001). Co-presented with Scott E. Thomsen J.D., International Juried Presentation.

Group Counselors: Mediators of Change. State of Missouri, Division of Youth Services, Annual Group Treatment Conference. (April 2001). Invited keynote speaker.

NCATE/Joint State Issues: Developing a NCATE/MoSTEP Virtual Documents Room. Missouri Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, Spring 2001 Conference. (April 2001). Invited presenter.

Techniques in Working with Couples. Southeast Missouri State University, Workshop. (April 2001). Presenter.

Working Outside "The Box.". Workshop, St. Louis Public Schools Counselors In-Service Conference, St. Louis, MO. (March 2001). Co-presenter.

Advanced Study

CACREP Team Leader Training, American Counseling Association Conference, (April 2004).

Child Molesters and Sexual Victimization, Presented by Ken Lanning (April 2002).

The Sexually Violent Offender, Presented by Roy Hazelwood, (May 2002).

Advanced Features of FrontPage XP and OIS, Presented by Center for Scholarship in Teaching and Learning, (May 2002).

Dr. Janice Ward

Publications

Duys, D., & Ward, J. (2004). Counselor cognitive complexity across training programs. Manuscript in preparation.

Duys, D., Ward, J. E., Maxwell, J., & Eaton, L. (2004). Career counseling in a volatile job market: Tiedeman’s perspective revisited. Manuscript in preparation.

Sommer, C. A., & Ward, J. E. (2003). Implementing the IDM through the use of metaphor and myth. Manuscript in review.

Skelton, D., Cruce, A., & Ward, J. (December, 2002). Collaborative strategies to create a caring connected society for the reduction of school violence. Proceedings of International Counseling Conference, Ho Chi Mihn City, Viet Nam.

Presentations

Assessing the Cognitive Complexity of Counselors in Training. American Counseling Association Conference, Kansas City, MO. (Spring, 2004). Co-presenter.

Counseling Outcomes Research: New Initiatives. Arkansas ACES 2004 Mid-Winter Conference, Harding University, Searcy, AR. (Spring, 2004). Co-presenter.

Counseling Supervision: Ethics and Scope of Practice. Arkansas ACES 2004 Mid-Winter Conference, Harding University, Searcy, AR. (Spring, 2004). Co-presenter.

The ASCA National Model: Implications for Arkansas School Counselors. Arkansas Counseling Association Conference, Hot Springs, AR. (Fall, 2003). Co-presenter.

The Reflecting Team Approach: A Techniques for Field Supervisors of LACs. Arkansas Counseling Association Conference, Hot Springs, AR. (Fall, 2003). Co-presenter.

Stop Bullying with Operation Respect. Arkansas Counseling Association Conference, Hot Springs, AR. (Fall, 2003). Co-presenter.

Applying Narrative to the Integrated Developmental Model of Supervision: Mythical Stories that Reflect Changes in Motivation, Autonomy, and Self and Other Awareness. North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Fall 2003 Conference, Cincinnati, OH. (Fall, 2003). Co-presenter.

The Use of Genograms in the Training of School Counselors and the Practice of School Counseling. Southern Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Fall 2003 Conference, Chattanooga, TN. (Fall, 2003). Co-presenter.

Skills Training Methodologies in CACREP Counselor Training Programs. Southern Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Fall 2003 Conference, Chattanooga, TN. (Fall, 2003). Presenter.

Operation Respect and the Don’t Laugh At Me Program. Arkansas Career Education & Guidance Conference, Eureka Springs, AR. (Spring, 2003). Co-presenter.

Group Supervision of Counselors in Training Using the Reflecting Team Approach. Arkansas ACES 2003 Mid-Winter Conference, Henderson State University, Arkadelphia, AR. (Spring, 2003). Co-presenter.

Don’t Laugh At Me. Crowley’s Ridge COOP Counselors Network, Harrisburg, AR. (Spring, 2003). Co-presenter.

The Development of Counseling Self-Efficacy During the Supervision Process. North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision, Oak Brook, IL. (Fall, 2001). Co-presenter.

Teaching Counselors to Work With Potentially Violent Diverse Youth. North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision, Oak Brook, IL. (Fall, 2001). Presenter.

Tracking Counselor Conceptual Complexity. North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision, Oak Brook, IL. (Fall, 2001). Co-presenter.

E. Adequate clerical assistance, technical equipment and support, software, and training are available to support faculty activities and the operations of the program and are commensurate with similar graduate programs.

There is one secretary in the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling: Ms. Linda Wilthong. Three student workers also help with clerical duties. In addition, two graduate research assistants are assigned to the Counseling Program faculty (Appendix IV.E).

Faculty have computers that include, email, internet access through the high speed LAN, and a shared laser printer. The university supports DOS/Windows based computers with updates to Microsoft Office XP. Departments and faculty can request additional programs. For example, the department supports Corel- WordPerfect 11. Faculty and students have access to the latest SPSS in the computer labs and faculty can request a license for their offices if needed. Faculty are also supplied with web server space. The Counseling program has a web page and all faculty have web pages that they maintain with course and contact information. Faculty also have audio/video equipment in their offices. Many of the classrooms are equipped with audio/video and computer equipment that allow for computer based (e.g. powerpoint, internet), overhead (ELMO) and video (VHS and DVD) presentations.

Information Technology (IT) and the Instructional Resources and Technology Center (IRTC) provide technological support for software and hardware. The Center for Scholarship in Teaching and Learning (CSTL) provides computer support and training. Further CSTL has authored the university’s Online Instructor Suite. This is a set of programs equivalent to other online instruction software. It allows for web based courses and web enhanced courses including: online testing, electronic assignments, online grade book access, and discussion groups (Appendix IV.E).

F. Program faculty members are assigned to provide classroom and clinical instructional services only in areas for which they have demonstrated knowledge and skills.

Faculty are only given teaching or supervision assignments in which they have education, training and experience.

G. The counselor education academic unit has made systematic and long-term efforts to attract and retain faculty from different ethnic, racial, gender, and personal backgrounds representative of the diversity among people in society.

The Counseling Program faculty are dedicated to providing students with diverse perspectives. To that end, significant attempts have been made to recruit counselor educators from diverse backgrounds. All faculty searches follow the University’s affirmative action policies and are approved thorough the Office of Equity Issues.

H. Adequate assistance, including technical support and professional development activities, is available for faculty members who are engaged in distance learning.

Several courses are taught online. The Center for Scholarship in Teaching and Learning (CSTL) offers support for all individuals teaching online and by Interactive Television (ITV). CSTL’s Online Instructor Suite is excellent in allowing faculty to manage online content and process (Appendix IV.E).


Section V: Organizational and Administration

A. Program descriptions and requirements are published and disseminated to all prospective students.

Following expression of interest in the counseling program, students receive a welcome letter that includes the name of their temporary advisor, requirements for completing their full admission to the Counseling Program, and the URL of the program website: http://www4.semo.edu/counsel (Appendix V.A).

B. A clear procedure for responding to inquiries of prospective students has been identified and carried out.

Following initial application to the Graduate School, a letter is sent to prospective students by the Graduate School. This letter is notification of provisional acceptance or denial.  Also included is the name and telephone number of the Admissions Coordinator in the Counseling Unit. Dr. A. Zaidy MohdZain is presently serving as the Admissions Coordinator. Descriptions of various programs are found online in the Graduate Bulletin and on the Counseling Program website (Appendix III.A, I.B, Page 32 and V.A).

The Counseling Program Admissions Coordinator, Dr. A. Zaidy MohdZain, responds to requests about the program. Dr. MohdZain is also the Community Counseling Coordinator and is designated to respond to inquiries concerning Community Counseling. The Counseling Program Coordinator, Dr. Verl T. Pope, also frequently responds to requests about the program.  Dr. Janice E. Ward is designated to provide specific information to prospective students in School Counseling. All faculty members participate regularly in providing information to prospective students when contacted (Appendix III.A).

D. Prior to or at the beginning of the first term of enrollment in the program, the following should occur for all new students :

During students’ first term in the program while enrolled in the course, CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics, students again receive the URL to the Student Handbook which contains all of the components listed below. It is recommended that the handbook be printed for students who desire a hard copy to read (Appendix II.H and II.A). 

1.  a new student orientation is conducted; and

It is preferred that the first course in the program be CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics. An exception is allowed for students who begin their study during the summer when the Orientation class is not offered. Students beginning in the summer semester work closely with their temporary advisor, take no more than six hours, and enroll in the Orientation course the following fall semester. Students are required to submit to a screening process in order to complete their full admission to the Counseling Program. This screening process occurs during the first class meeting of CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics. During the screening all faculty are introduced and program requirements are discussed in detail and provided in writing to the students. An opportunity for questions and comments is provided. During the second class meeting a detailed overview of the program is provided, including an explanation of the degree plans offered by the counseling program. Questions and comments from the students are solicited throughout the entire course. Additionally, small group activities are conducted during the semester, some of which include program faculty (Appendix II.H and V.D). 

2.  a student handbook is disseminated that includes the university's and/or program's:

The Student Handbook is referenced online in the Orientation class (Appendix II.A). It is also one of the required reading assignments for CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics (Appendix II.H).

a.  academic appeal  policy;

The academic appeal policy of Southeast Missouri State University states that students may first appeal their grade to the instructor, then to the Department Chair, then to the Dean of the College. Students may appeal their dismissal from the Program by appealing in writing to the Department Chair, who appoints a three member team of Program faculty who meet to review the merits of the appeal. The academic appeal policy is found in a subsection of the Student Handbook (Appendix II.A, Page 45).

b.  student retention policy explaining procedures for possible student remediation and/or dismissal from the program,

 A student may be dismissed for academic or non-academic reasons.  The student retention policy is found in the Student Handbook under the heading Policy on Student Retention (Appendix II.A, Page 45).

c.  written endorsement policy explaining the procedures for recommendation of students for credentialing and employment,

The counseling faculty follow the ACA Ethical Guidelines in offering recommendations and endorsements for professional placement. The policy is described in the Student Handbook under Endorsement Policy (Appendix II.A, Page 47).

d.  information about appropriate professional organizations (i.e., ACA, its divisions and/or branches), involvements, and activities potentially appropriate to students in the program, and

During the orientation course and in classes throughout the program, students are informed about ACA, its divisions and state branches. Students are encouraged to become members and are assisted by the faculty to participate in programs of appropriate organizations. Program faculty are active members who serve as role models for participation. Information about professional organizations is found in the Student Handbook under the heading Professional Organizations (Appendix II.A, Page 38).

e.  mission statement and program objectives.

The Mission Statement program objectives are found in the Student Handbook under Introduction to the Counseling Program - Program Objectives (Appendix II.A, Page 6).

D. The program has procedures for disseminating current information to all students enrolled in the program, and associated personnel.

The program maintains a comprehensive Website that is maintained with the most up-to-date information. On a biannual basis, the program disseminates a newsletter, The Perspective, to students, advisory board members, and personnel in cooperating and associated agencies.  The newsletter contains pertinent information about academic advising concerns, upcoming professional events, as well as current information about student and faculty professional activities.

E. The recommended ratio of FTE students to FTE faculty is 10:1.

The University Board of Regents required a complete review of all programs. During that review Institutional Research reported the official enrollment numbers for the programs. They reported that the Counseling programs officially had an Unduplicated Mean Number of Students Enrolled for Academic years 2001-2003 of 147.6 and a Mean Annual Credit Hour Production of 1150.2 (excluding summers). This gives a ratio of 10.65 student FTE to 1 faculty FTE. Executive Summary of the Counseling Programs Evaluation (Appendix V.G).

F. The teaching loads of program faculty are consistent with those of the institution’s other graduate level units that require intensive supervision as an integral part of professional preparation and incorporate time for:

The maximum teaching load for Tenure track graduate faculty of Southeast Missouri State University is nine hours per semester.  The teaching loads of program faculty are consistent with those of the institution’s other graduate level units. Teaching Loads (Appendix V.H).

 1.  advisement and supervision of student research using formulae consistent with established graduate school policies within the institution;

One requirement for the Master of Arts in Community Counseling and School Counseling is the course GR691 Methods of Research (Appendix II.H). Students are required to complete the first three chapters of a formal research paper. Students also research various topics of their choice in a number of the required graduate classes. Faculty members assist students in selecting appropriate resources for these topics. 

Students may elect to write a thesis however this choice is rare. Most students complete a Comprehensive Professional Counseling Portfolio including a sample of counseling skills and a theoretical orientation paper. Faculty members may serve on thesis committees but most often direct the portfolio completions. Students then submit to an oral defense over their counseling skills video and paper (Appendix II.A, Page 25).

2.  maintaining knowledge and skill as a counselor educator, which ordinarily includes ongoing scholarship and service; and  

Scholarly activities are a part of the professional development (merit) plan requirements summarized every year and submitted to the Chair, Dean, and Academic Provost as part of the Record of Service. (Due to the confidential nature of this information it will be made available only in "hard copy" to the review team.  It will be made available to the onsite team.)

3.  administrative responsibilities (if applicable).

The coordinator of the Counseling Program at Southeast Missouri State University is granted three hours release time from the regular nine hour teaching load.  Dr. Verl T. Pope’s teaching load is six hours, reflecting his role as coordinator and member of the graduate faculty. (Appendix III.A).

G. Graduate assistantships for program students are commensurate with graduate assistantships in other clinical training programs in the institution.

Two graduate assistants are assigned to work in the Counseling Program.  Students are selected for graduate assistantship positions based on their past experience and their stated goals. Graduate assistants collaborate with faculty research and activities to enrich and supplement their graduate program experiences (Appendix V.I).

H. A written policy has been developed to recruit students to represent a multicultural and diverse society has been developed and is implemented by program faculty.

The Community Counseling and School Counseling Programs faculty at Southeast Missouri State University train future counselors to function in a multicultural and diverse society and actively recruit students to reflect this diversity. The university has articulation agreements with several community colleges in order to increase access to diverse student populations and afford them an opportunity to continue their education. In 1994, the College of Education reformulated its recruitment activities to give priority to increasing the minority student population. Faculty in all programs are urged to participate in recruitment activities. Faculty in the Counseling Program are committed to recruiting students with diverse backgrounds. Coordination is made between the Minority Student Programs and the Counseling Programs.  For example, two cohorts have been started in the bootheel area of Missouri (Kennett and Poplar Bluff) to serve those with limited access to education (Appendix V.J).

I. The program admissions criteria, as well as selection and retention procedures, are distributed to prospective students.  The criteria and procedures include consideration of :

1.  input from regular, adjunct, and affiliate program faculty;

Admission criteria and retention procedures are in the online Student Handbook under the general heading Admission to the Counseling Programs. All program faculty meet to discuss each student's admission to the program (Appendix II.A, Page 9).

2.  each applicant's potential success in forming effective interpersonal   relationships in individual and small group contexts;

A personal interview with a member of the faculty and a current graduate student provides insight into the applicant's ability to function effectively as an individual and in a small group context.  During the Orientation class, small group activities are conducted and observed by program faculty to assess interpersonal skills.

3.  each applicant’s aptitude for graduate-level study, including technological competence and computer literacy;

The Graduate School requires that applicants have a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 and GRE scores at the 50th percentile in the analytical and verbal components.  Furthermore, the Graduate School has a procedure on admission for probationary status; procedure described in  Probationary Admission (Appendix II.A, Page 9).

Students in CP 610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics are expected to demonstrate their technological competence and computer literacy.  (Appendix II.H. CP610 IV C.)

4.  each applicant's vocational goals and objectives, and their relevance to the program;

The applicant interview, which is conducted during the screening process, is the method used to assess the relevance of the applicant's vocational goals and objectives.  Applicants furnish a writing sample, which is autobiographical and discusses their interest in becoming a counselor. 

5.  each applicant's openness to self-examination and personal and professional self-development; and

Openness to self-examination and personal and professional self-development are addressed in the required first course of the program, CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics (Appendix II.H). Additionally, these needs are addressed and carefully assessed throughout courses in the program. Insight is also provided during the applicant interview and from the autobiographical writing sample.

J. Admission decision recommendations are made by an academic unit’s selection committee.

The admission committee is composed of all counseling program faculty. Department Committees (Appendix IV.A)

K. Effort is made to secure financial assistance for students in the program, including all of the following:

1.  monitoring to ensure that the program receives a proportionate share of institutional funds allocated for such purposes; and

The program receives a share of graduate assistantships, which are allocated through the Office of the Graduate Dean, and our students are eligible for the same financial support as any other graduate students.

2.  informing students of available loans, part-time work, graduate assistantships and fellowships, and other sources of financial aid.

The Counseling Program brochure, the Graduate Bulletin and the Student Handbook under the specific heading Graduate Assistantships discuss graduate assistantships.  A bulletin board with job announcements and information about other sources of financial aid is maintained in the office and in the hall immediately outside the office.  Faculty announce in classes information on job availability (Appendix I.B, Page 17 and V.M).

L. Students have an assigned faculty advisor at all times during enrollment in the program.  Students, with their faculty advisor, develop a planned program of study prior to the completion of twelve (12) semester or eighteen (18) quarter hours of graduate study.  The planned program of study identifies the following:

All students have an advisor at all times during their enrollment in the program.  All full-time tenure track faculty members of the counseling program serve as advisors. Students are assigned the Admissions Coordinator as a Temporary Advisor. Once the admissions process is complete, a permanent advisor is assigned (Appendix V.P).

1. program prerequisite curricular experiences,

All Program Prerequisites are completed before acceptance into the counseling program or concurrently with coursework in the first or second semester of study. Courses with prerequisites are clearly outlined in the initial study plan (Appendix II.A, Page 13 and V.Q).

            2. core curricular requirements,

The students develop a preliminary study plan before completion of twelve semester hours. Core curriculum requirements are clearly outlined in the initial study plan. (Study Plan) (Appendix II.A, Page 13 and V.Q)

            3. specialized curricular experiences,

Specialized curricular experiences in the Community Counseling Program and the School Counseling Program are clearly outlined in the preliminary study plan (Appendix V.Q).

            4. supervised practicum and internship requirements, and

The practicum and internship requirements are found in the Student Handbook under the specific heading Guidelines for Practicum and Internship Experiences (Appendix II.A, Page 47).

5. appropriate elective curricular requirements.

Several previous program electives were subsumed into the curriculum when the 48-hour programs were developed. One popular and appropriate elective is Marriage and Family Counseling; other electives are offered as the need is recognized.


Section VI: Evaluations in the Program

A. Program mission, objectives and student learning outcomes are developed and revised when necessary through self-study on a regular schedule. This evaluation process is based on input from program faculty, current and former students, and personnel in cooperating agencies.

The Counseling Program has a specific assessment process. The process begins before admission of the student and continues after graduation and employment. External information is gathered from the Advisory Board and professional bodies such as CACREP. This information is synthesized on an ongoing basis. Each year information is gathered, a report is written and faculty review the program for any needed changes. These changes may be due to needs in the profession, certification or licensure changes, community needs, and/or student performance (Appendix VI.A).

B. The program faculty conduct a developmental, systematic assessment of each student’s progress throughout the program, including consideration of the student’s academic performance, professional development, and personal development.

The Counseling faculty have implemented a Portfolio Process that requires all students to complete and defend a Comprehensive Professional Counseling Portfolio. This includes evaluation of didactic work, field experience and personal/professional development (Appendix II.A, Page 25).

C. Faculty establish a comprehensive, integrated plan of program evaluation, indicating how the mission, objectives, and student learning outcomes are met. Program evaluations must be ongoing, with formal evaluation occurring as follows:

1. an annual evaluation that documents how, where, and the extent to which program objectives are addressed in course syllabi;

2. a review by program faculty of programs, curricular offerings, and characteristics of program applicants;

An annual assessment report is completed and faculty review program objectives, how the objectives are being met, any changes in objectives or curricular offering and over all characteristics of the program (Appendix VI.C).

3. at least once every three years, program faculty conduct and document findings of formal follow-up studies of program graduates to assess graduate perceptions and evaluations of major aspects of the program;

4. at least once every three years, program faculty conduct and document findings of formal follow-up studies of clinical site supervisors and program graduate employers to assess their perceptions and evaluations of major aspects of the program; and

Triennially a Program Evaluation Survey is sent to all graduates, supervisors and employers. This includes information on perceptions and evaluation of the counseling program. A report is written and made available through the program's web page (Appendix VI.C).

5. at least once every three years, program faculty document use of findings from VI. C.1, 2, 3, and 4 above in program modifications.

Before each annual report is submitted, program faculty meet to discus program and curriculum implications. If changes are warranted then they are made. These are reported in the Annual Report. Further in 2004 a Report was generated for the Board of Regents concerning the Counseling programs. (Table 8) (Appendix VI.C).

D. An official report that documents outcomes of the comprehensive program evaluation shall be prepared and distributed on a systematic basis (at least once every three years) to students currently in the program, program faculty, institutional administrators, and personnel in cooperating agencies (e.g., employers, site supervisors).

Our Triennial Survey Report is made available to all via the program's web page.

E. Students have regular and systematic opportunities to formally evaluate faculty and the students’ curricular experiences.

Students use the national IDEA evaluation form to evaluate faculty each semester.  In addition to evaluations, faculty members are continuously receptive to student feedback. (Due to the confidential nature of this information it will be made available only in "hard copy" to the review team.  It will be made available to the onsite team.) (Appendix II.B).

F. Provide annual results of student course evaluations to faculty.

Faculty are provided with the results of student course evaluation at the end of each semester. Faculty keep these evaluations themselves.

G. present written faculty evaluation procedures to program faculty at the beginning of each evaluation period and whenever changes are made in the procedures.

Faculty are evaluated on an annual basis in conjunction with the Record of Service and Merit Pay process. A committee composed of faculty members and the department chair reviews each person’s Record of Service. The procedures are available to faculty (Appendix IV.G).


Standards for Community Counseling Programs

In addition to the common core curricular experiences outlined in Section II.K, the following curricular experiences and demonstrated knowledge and skills are required of all students in the program. All course syllabi are found in Appendix II.H.

A. FOUNDATIONS OF COMMUNITY COUNSELING

1. historical, philosophical, societal, cultural, economic, and political dimensions of and current trends in the community human service/ mental health movement;

Documented in the following course syllabi:

2. roles, functions, preparation standards, credentialing, licensure and professional identity of community counselors;

Documented in the following course syllabi:

3. policies, laws, legislation, recognition, reimbursement, right-to-practice, and other issues relevant to community counseling;

Documented in the following course syllabi:

4. ethical and legal considerations specifically related to the practice of community counseling (e.g., the ACA Code of Ethics); and

Documented in the following course syllabi:

5. the role of racial, ethnic, and cultural heritage, nationality, socioeconomic status, family structure, age, gender, sexual orientation, religious and spiritual beliefs, occupation, and physical and mental status, and equity issues in community counseling.

B. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS OF COMMUNITY COUNSELING

1. the roles of community counselors in various practice settings and the relationships between counselors and other professionals in these settings;

Documented in the course syllabi:

2. organizational, fiscal, and legal dimensions of the institutions and settings in which community counselors practice;

Documented in the course syllabi:

3. strategies for community needs assessment to design, implement, and evaluate community counseling interventions, programs, and systems; and

Documented in the course syllabi:

4. general principles of community intervention, consultation, education, and outreach; and characteristics of human services programs and networks (public, private, and volunteer) in local communities.

Documented in the course syllabi:

C. KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMUNITY COUNSELORS

1. typical characteristics of individuals and communities served by a variety of institutions and agencies that offer community counseling services;

Documented in the course syllabi:

2. models, methods, and principles of program development and service delivery for a clientele based on assumptions of human and organizational development, including prevention, implementation of support groups, peer facilitation training, parent education, career/occupational information and counseling, and encouragement of self-help;

Documented in the course syllabi:

3.effective strategies for promoting client understanding of and access to community resources;

Documented in the course syllabi:

4. principles and models of biopsychosocial assessment, case conceptualization, theories of human development and concepts of normalcy and psychopathology leading to diagnoses and appropriate counseling plans;

Documented in the course syllabi:

5. knowledge of the principles of diagnosis and the use of current diagnostic tools, including the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual;

Documented in the course syllabi:

6. effective strategies for client advocacy in public policy and other matters of equity and accessibility; and

Documented in the course syllabi:

7. application of appropriate individual, couple, family, group, and systems modalities for initiating, maintaining, and terminating counseling, including the use of crisis intervention, and brief, intermediate, and long-term approaches.

Documented in the course syllabi:

D. CLINICAL INSTRUCTION

For the Community Counseling Program, the 600 clock hour internship (Standard III.H) occurs in a community setting, under the clinical supervision of a site supervisor as defined by Section III, Standard C.1 - 2. The requirement includes a minimum of 240 direct service clock hours.

Documented in the course syllabus for CP686-7 Internship – Community and the Student Handbook.

The program must clearly define and measure the outcomes expected of interns, using appropriate professional resources that address Standards A, B, and C (Community Counseling Programs). 

Documented in the course syllabus for CP686-7 Internship – Community and the Student Handbook.


Standards for School Counseling Programs

In addition to the common core curricular experiences outlined in Section II.K, the following curricular experiences and demonstrated knowledge and skills are required of all students in the program. All course syllabi are found in Appendix II.H.

A. FOUNDATIONS OF SCHOOL COUNSELING

1. History, philosophy, and current trends in school counseling and educational systems;

Documented in the following syllabi:

2. Relationship of the school counseling program to the academic and student services program in the school;

Documented in the following course syllabi:

3. role, function, and professional identity of the school counselor in relation to the roles of other professional and support personnel in the school;

Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • 4. Strategies of leadership designed to enhance the learning environment of schools;

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP614 Counseling Skills
  • CP680 Counseling Practicum
  • CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
  • 5. Knowledge of the school setting, environment, and pre-k-12 curriculum;

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP680 Counseling Practicum
  • CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
  • 6. current issues, policies, laws, and legislation relevant to school counseling;

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP680 Counseling Practicum
  • CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
  • 7. the role of racial, ethnic, and cultural heritage, nationality, socioeconomic status, family structure, age, gender, sexual orientation, religious and spiritual beliefs, occupation, physical and mental status, and equity issues in school counseling;

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP613 Social and Cultural Aspects of Counseling
  • CP614 Counseling Skills
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • 8. knowledge and application of community, environmental, and institutional opportunities that enhance, as well as barriers that impede student academic, career, and personal/social success and overall development;

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • 9. knowledge and application of current and emerging technology in education and school counseling to assist students, families, and educators in using resources that promote informed academic, career, and personal/social choices; and

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP615 Career Development
  • 10. ethical and legal considerations related specifically to the practice of school counseling (e.g., the ACA Code of Ethics and ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors).

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
  • CP614 Counseling Skills
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP680 Counseling Practicum
  • CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
  • B. CONTEXTUAL DIMENSIONS OF SCHOOL COUNSELING

    Studies that provide an understanding of the coordination of counseling program components as they relate to the total school community, including all of the following:

    1. Advocacy for all students and for effective school counseling programs;

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
  • CP613 Social and Cultural Aspects of Counseling
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • 2. coordination, collaboration, referral, and team-building efforts with teachers, parents, support personnel, and community resources to promote program objectives and facilitate successful student development and achievement of all students;

    Documented in the following course syllabus:

  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • 3. integration of the school counseling program into the total school curriculum by systematically providing information and skills training to assist pre-k-12 students in maximizing their academic, career, and personal/social development;

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP615 Career Development
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • 4. promotion of the use of counseling and guidance activities and programs by the total school community to enhance a positive school climate;

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP680 Counseling Practicum
  • CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
  • CP617 Assessment in Counseling
  • GR691 Methods of Research
  • 5. methods of planning for and presenting school counseling-related educational programs to administrators, teachers, parents, and the community;

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
  • 6. methods of planning, developing, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating comprehensive developmental counseling programs; and

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • CP680 Counseling Practicum
  • CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
  • 7. knowledge of prevention and crisis intervention strategies.

    Documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
  • CP611 Developmental Theories
  • CP612 Counseling Theories
  • CP613 Social and Cultural Aspects of Counseling
  • CP614 Counseling Skills
  • CP617 Assessment in Counseling
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • CP680 Counseling Practicum
  • CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
  • C. Knowledge and Skill Requirement for School Counselors

    1. Program, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation

    a. use, management, analysis, and presentation of data from school based information (e.g., standardized testing, grades, enrollment, attendance, retention, placement), surveys, interviews, focus groups, and needs assessment to improve student outcomes;
    b. design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of comprehensive developmental school counseling programs (e.g., the ASCA National Standards for School Counseling Programs) including an awareness of various systems that affect students, school, and home;
    c. implementation and evaluation of specific strategies that meet program goals and objectives;
    d. identification of student academic, career, and personal/social competencies and the implementation of processes and activities to assist students in achieving these competencies;
    e. preparation of an action plan and school counseling calendar that reflect appropriate time commitments and priorities in a comprehensive developmental school counseling program;
    f. strategies for seeking and securing alternative funding for program expansion; and
    g. use of technology in the design, implementation. monitoring and evaluation of a comprehensive school counseling program.

    For the above requirements 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 1f and 1g documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
  • CP612 Counseling Theories
  • CP611 Developmental Theories
  • CP613 Social and Cultural Aspects of Counseling
  • CP615 Career Development
  • CP617 Assessment in Counseling
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • CP680 Counseling Practicum
  • CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
  • 2. Counseling and Guidance

    a. individual and small-group counseling approaches that promote school success, through academic, career, and personal/social development for all;
    b. individual, group, and classroom guidance approaches systematically designed to assist all students with academic, career and personal/social development;
    c. approaches to peer facilitation, including peer helper, peer tutor, and peer mediation programs;
    d. issues that may affect the development and functioning of students (e.g. abuse, violence, eating disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, childhood depression and suicide)
    e. developmental approaches to assist all students and parents at appoints of educational transition (e.g. home to elementary school, elementary to middle to high school, high school to postsecondary education and career options);
    f. constructive partnerships with parents, guardians, families, and communities in order to promote each student’s academic, career, personal/social success;
    g. systems theories and relationships among and between community systems, family systems, and school systems, and how they interact to influence the students and affect each system
    h. approaches to recognizing and assisting children and adolescents who may use alcohol or other drugs or who may reside in a home where substance abuse occurs.

    For the above requirements 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 2g, 2h documented in the following course syllabi:

  • CP610 Counseling Orientation and Ethics
  • CP612 Counseling Theories
  • CP611 Developmental Theories
  • CP613 Social and Cultural Aspects of Counseling
  • CP614 Counseling Skills
  • CP615 Career Development
  • CP617 Assessment in Counseling
  • CP630 Foundations of School Counseling
  • CP631 Consultation and Counseling Issues in Schools
  • CP680 Counseling Practicum
  • CP682-4 Internship – Elementary, Secondary and School Counseling
  • 3. Consultation

    a. strategies to promote, develop, and enhance effective team work within the school and larger community;
    b. theories, models, and processes of consultation and change with teachers, administrators, other school personnel, parents, community groups, agencies and students as appropriate;
    c. strategies and methods of working with parents, guardians, families, and communities to empower them to act on behalf of their children;
    d. knowledge and skills in conducting programs that are designed to enhance students’ academic, social, emotional, career, and other developmental needs.

    The major portion of the above requirements 3a, 3b, 3c and 3d documented in the following course syllabi:

    However, the following course syllabi also address a portion/part of the above requirements:

    D. CLINICAL INSTRUCTION


    For the School Counseling Program, the 600 clock hour internship (Standard III.H) occurs in a school counseling setting, under the supervision of a site supervisor as defined by Section III, Standard C.1-2. The requirement includes a minimum of 240 direct service clock hours.

    Documented in the course syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – School and the Student Handbook.

    The program must clearly define and measure the outcomes expected of interns, using appropriate professional resources that address Standards A, B, and C (School Counseling Programs).

    Documented in the course syllabus for CP682-4 Internship – School and the Student Handbook.