Southeast Missouri State University
Environmental Science Program

 

Biology Option

Human impacts on ecosystems and on the species with which we share the planet are increasing, and this is reflected in growing concern for the wise use of ecosystems and the management and preservation of species. The biology option is designed to broadly educate students in environmental science, with more in-depth study of the living components of our environment. In addition to core courses in biology and a required internship or research experience, students may select from a variety of courses in biology, botany, or zoology.

Human health may also be impacted by adverse changes in our environment and the course of study of the biology option is also designed to prepare interested students for post-graduate training in environmental medicine or environmental health.

Environmental issues frequently become legal issues. There is a societal need for individuals trained in biology, environmental science, and law. The course of study of the environmental science major is designed to prepare interested students for post-graduate training in environmental law.

Several faculty of the Environmental Science Program conduct active research projects related to the biology option, providing opportunities for students to participate in the faculty’s research program, conduct supervised independent research, and to present and/or publish their research.

Graduates in this option are anticipated to be successful in finding employment in the environmental field and to be highly competitive for admission to graduate programs in biological and environmental sciences, as well as, medical and law school programs.

Faculty Advisor:

Dr. Stephen Overmann, Department of Biology

Career Opportunities:

Employment in government, business, industry, and consulting firms; advanced study in graduate school, medical school, and law school.

Visit the Career Opportunities page to see what sort of careers are available in the environmental field.

Employment Outlook:

Overall, there is a continuing demand for individuals with training and expertise in the environmental field.

High School Preparation For Major:

A college preparatory sequence which includes four years of science (including biology, chemistry, earth science, and physics) and four years of mathematics. Advanced Placement or dual credit courses in science, mathematics, and English are strongly recommended.

Courses (credit hours) 16 hours

Core (10)
BI 151 Biological Reasoning (3)
          BI 152 Introduction to Scientific Investigation (1)
BI 153 Introduction to Organismal Biology (4)
BO 200 Plant Biology (3) or ZO 200 Animal Biology (3) 
     Whichever was not completed in core.

Electives (6)
BI 381 Genetics (3)
BI 420 Management of Wildlife Populations (3)
BI 430 Management of Wildlife Habitat (3)
BI 432 Advanced Ecology (3)
BI 435 Conservation Biology (3)
BI 440 Ecology and Management of Wetlands (3)
BI 441 Virology (3)
BI 442 Immunology (3)
          BI 443 Epidemiology (3)
BI 445 Microbial Physiology (3)
BI 452 Limnology (3)
BI 453 Occupational Health (3)
BI 455 Industrial Hygiene (3) 
BI 460 Introduction to Toxicology (3) 
BI 469 Wildlife Toxicology (3) 
BI 471-3 Internship in Biology (1-3)
          BI 479 Introduction to Aquatic Toxicology (3)
BI 543 Pathogenic Microbiology (2)
BI 544 Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory (1)
BI 589-91 Biological Research (1-3)
BO 361 Systematic Botany (3)
BO 445 Plant Physiology (3)
          BO 461 Native Aquatic Plants (3)
BO 469 Field Botany (3)
ZO 331 Animal Physiology (3)
ZO 459 Mammalogy (3)
ZO 460 Herpetology (3)
ZO 463 Aquatic Invertebrates (3)
ZO 464 Terrestrial Invertebrates (3)
ZO 466 Ornithology (3)
ZO 469 Vertebrate Adaptations (3)
ZO 478 Ichthyology (3)

For more information about the program or this page, contact environsci@semo.edu.

Go to Environmental Science Program Homepage

Go to Southeast Missouri State University Department of Biology Homepage

Go to Southeast Missouri State University Homepage

Last revision: February 20, 2006

Copyright 2005, Southeast Missouri State University
Disclaimer