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The Relational Assessment Questionnaire (RAQ)
by
Dr. William E. Snell, Jr.

This page shows a copy of the Relational Assessment Questionnaire.

 


RAQ
RELATIONSHIP SURVEY INSTRUCTIONS: The items listed below refer to people in a close relationship--i.e., a relationship between two partners in an intimate relationship. Please read each item carefully and decide to what extent it is characteristics of your feelings and behaviors. Give each item a rating of how much it applies to you by using the following scale:
A = Not at all characteristic of me.
B = Slightly characteristic of me.
C = Somewhat characteristic of me.
D = Moderately characteristic of me.
E = Very characteristic of me.

  NOTE:
Remember to respond to all items, even if you are not completely sure.
Also, please be honest in responding to these items. 

1. I am a good partner for an intimate relationship.
2. I am depressed about the relationship aspects of my life.
3. I think about intimate relationships all the time.
4. I am better at intimate relationships than most other people.
5. I feel good about myself as an intimate partner.
6. I think about close relationships more than anything else.
7. I sometimes have doubts about my relationship competence.
8. I am disappointed about the quality of my close relationship.
9. I don't daydream very much about intimate relationships.
10. I am not very sure of myself in close relationships.
11. I cannot seem to be happy in intimate relationships.
12. I tend to be preoccupied with close relationships.
13. I think of myself as an excellent intimate partner.
14. I am less than happy with my ability to sustain an intimate relationship.
15. I'm constantly thinking about being in an intimate relationship.
16. I would rate myself as a "poor" partner for a close relationship.
17. I feel down about myself as an intimate partner.
18. I think about intimate relationships a great deal of the time.
19. I am confident about myself as a relationship partner.
20. I feel unhappy about my interpersonal relationships.
21. I seldom think about being involved in a close relationship.
22. I am not very confident about my potential as an intimate partner.
23. I feel pleased with my love relationships.
24. I hardly ever fantasize about highly intimate relationships.
25. I sometimes doubt my ability to maintain a close relationship.
26. I feel sad when I think about my intimate experiences.
27. I probably think about love relationships less often than most people.
28. I have few doubts about my capacity to relate to an intimate partner.
29. I am not discouraged about myself as a loving partner.
30. I don't think about intimate relationships very often.
31. I responded to the above based on:
(A) A current intimate relationship.
(B) A past intimate relationship.
(C) An imagined intimate relationship.

Copyright - 1996

Scoring Instructions for 
the Relational Assessment Questionnaire (RAQ):
SCORING INSTRUCTIONS
The Relational Assessment Questionnaire consists of the following three scales:

1. Relational Esteem (Items 1, 4, 5, 13, 19, 28, 29):
The relational-esteem items concern a generalized tendency to positively evaluate one's capacity to relate intimately to another partner. It concerns our sense of adequacy as an intimate partner and is embodied in such questions as, Do we feel positive about ourselves as an intimate partner? Do we feel confident and assured as an intimate partner? Relationship-esteem concerns how we feel about ourselves in regard to our intimate relationships.
1. I am a good partner for an intimate relationship.
4. I am better at intimate relationships than most other people.
5. I feel good about myself as an intimate partner.
13. I think of myself as an excellent intimate partner.
19. I am confident about myself as a relationship partner.
28. I have few doubts about my capacity to relate to an intimate partner.
29. I am not discouraged about myself as a loving partner.
2. Relational-Depression: (Items 2, 7, 8, 14, 16, 17, 20, 22, 25, 26) :
Relational-depression is defined as a tendency to evaluate one's relationship potential in a negative fashion and to feel depressed about one's capability to relate in an intimate way to a close partner.
2. I am depressed about the relationship aspects of my life.
7. I sometimes have doubts about my relationship competence.
8. I am disappointed about the quality of my close relationship.
14. I am less than happy with my ability to sustain an intimate relationship.
16. I would rate myself as a "poor" partner for a close relationship.
17. I feel down about myself as an intimate partner.
20. I feel unhappy about my interpersonal relationships.
22. I am not very confident about my potential as an intimate partner.
25. I sometimes doubt my ability to maintain a close relationship.
26. I feel sad when I think about my intimate experiences.

3. Relational-Preoccupation: (Items 3, 6, 9, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30):
Relational-preoccupation is defined as the tendency to become absorbed in, obsessed with, and engrossed with intimate relationships, to the extent that one virtually excludes from one's mind thoughts of other matters.
3. I think about intimate relationships all the time.
6. I think about close relationships more than anything else.
9. I don't daydream very much about intimate relationships. (R)
15. I'm constantly thinking about being in an intimate relationship.
18. I think about intimate relationships a great deal of the time.
21. I seldom think about being involved in a close relationship. (R)
24. I hardly ever fantasize about highly intimate relationships. (R)
27. I probably think about love relationships less often than most people. (R)
30. I don't think about intimate relationships very often. (R)

CODING INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE RELATIONAL ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE (RAQ):
First, the items designated with (R) are reverse-coded (A=E; B=D; C=C; D=B; E=A). Then, the items are coded so that A = 0, B = 1, C = 2, D = 3, and E = 4; and next the items listed on each scale are summed, so that higher scores on the RAS subscales correspond to greater relational-esteem, relational-depression, and relational-preoccupation.

ABSTRACT
Measuring Relational Aspects of the Self: Relational-Esteem, Relational-Depression, and Relational-Preoccupation.
William E. Snell, Jr., Phillip D. Finney, Southeast Missouri State University.
    A number of researchers have examined the impact of self-related tendencies on intimate relationships. The present investigation extended this tradition through the development and validation of an objective self-report instrument which measures relational-esteem, the tendency to positively evaluate one's capacity to relate intimately to another person; relational-depression, the tendency to feel depressed about the status of one's intimate relationships; and relational-preoccupation, the tendency to be highly obsessed with thoughts about intimate relationships. Factor analysis confirmed the tri-component nature of the Relational Assessment Questionnaire, and reliability analyses provided evidence for each scale's internal consistency and stability. The convergent and discriminant validity of the RAQ was indicated through results showing that relational-esteem, relational-depression, and relational-preoccupation were related in predictable ways to interpersonal involvement and attraction. The discussion focuses on the potential uses of the Relational Assessment Questionnaire in applied clinical and research settings.

Permission is granted to individuals to use
 the Relational Assessment Questionnaire (RAQ) for research purposes.
Permission granted by William E. Snell, Jr. on February 18, 1997.


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Department of Psychology, SE Missouri State University
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